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let rec move_robot (pos: int) (dir: string) (num_moves: int) : int =

    let new_forward_position = pos + num_moves in
    if (new_forward_position > 99) then failwith "cannot move beyond 99 steps"
    else new_forward_position

    let new_backward_position = pos - num_moves in
    if (new_backward_position pos < 0) then failwith "cannot move less than 0 steps"
    else new_backward_position

    begin match dir with 
    | "forward" -> new_forward position
    | "backward" -> new_backward_position
    end

I keep on getting "unexpected token in" for the let new_backward_position line. What is my error?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a code that compiles:

let rec move_robot pos dir num_moves =
    let new_forward_position = pos + num_moves in
    if new_forward_position > 99 then failwith "cannot move beyond 99 steps";

    let new_backward_position = pos - num_moves in
    if new_backward_position < 0 then failwith "cannot move less than 0 steps";

    begin match dir with
    | "forward" -> new_forward_position
    | "backward" -> new_backward_position
    end

I modified several things:

  • Important: if foo then bar else qux is an expression in OCaml, which takes either the value bar or qux. Thus bar and qux needs to have the same type.
  • new_backward_position instead of new_backward_position pos
  • you don't need type annotations : OCaml has type inference
  • no need for parentheses around the if clause
  • typo in new_forward position

Also, with your code's logic, let _ = move_robot 0 "forward" 5 fails. Shouldn't it return 5 instead? I suggest you define a sum type for pos and do a pattern matching on it first.

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What typo had I made in new_forward_position? –  user1993381 Jan 19 '13 at 23:21
    
One _ was missing. –  jrouquie Jan 20 '13 at 9:19

Your code has this basic structure if you assume the failures won't happen:

let f () =
    let p = 3 in p
    let q = 5 in q
    ...

It's not clear what you're trying to do, but this isn't well formed OCaml (as the compiler tells you). Maybe want you want is something more like this:

let f () =
    let p = 3 in
    let q = 5 in
    match ...

If so, you need to move your ifs before your ins:

let f () =
    let p = if badp then failwith "" else 3 in
    let q = if badq then failwith "" else 5 in
    match ...

Or maybe this is more what you want:

let f () =
    let p = 3 in
    let () = if badp p then failwith "" in
    let q = 5 in
    let () = if badq q then failwith "" in
    match ...

(I hope this is helpful.)

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