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I'm developing a game client in which texture colors are stored as int values. Sometimes, however, I have to use 16bit colors to draw some texture... so I would like to know how to convert 32bit color to 16bit color and vice versa... preferably avoiding managed functions like Color.FromArgb() and similar. I prefer to achieve those operations as fast as possible with byte shifting. Do you also know how to get the grayscale value of a 32 bit color?

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Why are you against using the built in managed functions if they are available? Do you have any proof that the performance hit, if any, matters in your case? –  Frazell Thomas Jan 19 '13 at 23:11
    
Anyone who ever worked with colors in a performance critical way, knows that they are a HUGE performance hit. The OP is quite right in looking for another way. It's worth considering that, these operations run once per pixel (which is for a not very big, like 1000x1000 image, 1000000 runs). Which means one needs to be very careful with these. –  canahari Jan 20 '13 at 0:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
    public static Int32 16To32(UInt16 color)
    {
        Int32 red = (Int32)(((color >> 0xA) & 0x1F) * 8.225806f);
        Int32 green = (Int32)(((color >> 0x5) & 0x1F) * 8.225806f);
        Int32 blue = (Int32)((color & 0x1F) * 8.225806f);

        if (red < 0)
            red = 0;
        else if (red > 0xFF)
            red = 0xFF;

        if (green < 0)
            green = 0;
        else if (green > 0xFF)
            green = 255;

        if (blue < 0)
            blue = 0;
        else if (blue > 0xFF)
            blue = 0xFF;

        return ((red << 0x10) | (green << 0x8) | blue);
    }

    public static UInt16 32To16(Int32 color)
    {
        Int32 red = ((((color >> 0x10) & 0xFF) * 0x1F) + 0x7F) / 0xFF;
        Int32 green = ((((color >> 0x8) & 0xFF) * 0x1F) + 0x7F) / 0xFF;
        Int32 blue = (((color & 0xFF) * 0x1F) + 0x7F) / 0xFF;

        return (UInt16)(0x8000 | (red << 0xA) | (green << 0x5) | blue);
    }

For what concerns grayscaling... you could try the following function but I just wrote it without testing so I cannot guarantee it will work perfectly:

    public static Int32 Grayscale(Int32 color)
    {
        Single red = ((color >> 0xA) & 0x1F) * 8.225806f;
        Single green = ((color >> 0x5) & 0x1F) * 8.225806f;
        Single blue = (color & 0x1F) * 8.225806f;

        Int32 grayscale = (Int32)(((red * 0.299f) + (green * 0.587f) + (blue * 0.114f)) * 0.1215686f);

        if (grayscale < 0)
            grayscale = 0;
        else if (grayscale > 0x1F)
            grayscale = 0x1F;

        return grayscale;
    }
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if (uint) red < 0??? –  spender Jan 19 '13 at 23:17
    
Sorry man, I edited. I used UInt32 instead of Int32. –  Zarathos Jan 19 '13 at 23:40
    
Hello! I'd recommend to make a lookup table instead of calculating the colors again and again using this. Then you'd need to do the float calculations and casts only once, instead you'd use a very very cheap array indexing. –  canahari Jan 19 '13 at 23:55
    
That's a good idea! –  Zarathos Jan 19 '13 at 23:57
1  
8 bits have 256 possible values. 5 bits have 32 possible values. You convert by multiplying by 31 and dividing by 255. You add a half in there to offset the resulting values into the middle of the range, but this doesn't get around the compression. If you plot a histogram of your output, you'd see it looked pretty horrible. The correct thing to do is to multiply by 32 and divide by 256, which is equivalent to dividing by 8, a simple shift. –  JasonD Jan 20 '13 at 0:08

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