Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been searching for quite some time for a good solution to the problems presented by the typical Repository pattern (growing list of methods for specialized queries, etc.. see: http://ayende.com/blog/3955/repository-is-the-new-singleton).

I really like the idea of using Command queries, particularly through use of the Specification pattern. However, my problem with specification is that it only relates to the criteria of simple selections (basically, the where clause), and does not deal with the other issues of queries, such as joining, grouping, subset selection or projection, etc.. basically, all the extra hoops many queries must go through to get the correct set of data.

(note: I use the term "command" as in the Command pattern, also known as query objects. I'm not talking about command as in command/query separation where there is a distinction made between queries and commands (update, delete, insert))

So I'm looking for alternatives that encapsulate the entire query, but still flexible enough that you're not just swapping spaghetti Repositories for an explosion of command classes.

I've used, for instance Linqspecs, and while I find some value in being able to assign meaningful names to selection criteria, it's just not enough. Perhaps i'm seeking a blended solution that combines multiple approaches.

I am looking for solutions that others may have developed to either address this problem, or address a different problem but still satisfies these requirements. In the linked article, Ayende suggests using the nHibernate context directly, but I feel that largely complicates your business layer because it now also has to contain query information.

I'll be offering a bounty on this, as soon as the waiting period elapses. So please make your solutions bounty worthy, with good explanations and I will select the best solution, and upvote the runners up.

NOTE: I'm looking for something that is ORM based. Doesn't have to be EF or nHibernate explicitly, but those are the most common and would fit the best. If it can be easily adapted to other ORM's that would be a bonus. Linq compatible would also be nice.

UPDATE: I'm really surprised that there aren't many good suggestions here. It seems like people are either totally CQRS, or they're completely in the Repository camp. Most of my apps are not complex enough to warrant CQRS (something with most CQRS advocates readily say that you should not use it for).

UPDATE: There seems to be a little confusion here. I'm not looking for a new data access technology, but rather a reasonably well designed interface between business and data.

Ideally, what i'm looking for is some kind of cross between Query objects, Specification pattern, and repository. As I said above, Specification pattern only deals with the where clause aspect, and not the other aspects of the query, such as joins, sub-selects, etc.. Repositories deal with the whole query, but get out of hand after a while. Query objects also deal with the whole query, but I don't want to simply replace repositories with explosions of query objects.

share|improve this question
3  
Fantastic question. I too would like to see what people with more experience than I suggest. I am working on a code base at the moment where the generic repository also contains overloads for Command objects or Query objects, who's structure is similar to what Ayende describes in his blog. PS: This might also attract some attention on programmers.SE. –  Simon Whitehead Jan 20 '13 at 0:55
    
Why not just use a repository that exposes IQueryable if you don't mind the dependency on LINQ? A common approach is a generic repository, and then when you need reuseable logic above that you create a derived repository type with your additional methods. –  devdigital Jan 20 '13 at 12:34
    
@devdigital - Dependency on Linq is not the same as dependency upon data implementation. I would like to use Linq to objects, so I can sort or perform other business layer functions. But that doesn't mean I want dependencies on the data model implementation. What i'm really talking about here is layer/tier interface. As an example, I want to be able to change a query and not have to change it in 200 places, which is what happens if you push IQueryable directly into the business model. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 20 '13 at 23:20
    
Not if you 'create a derived repository type with your additional methods' for the cases where you wish to share query logic –  devdigital Jan 21 '13 at 0:02
1  
@MystereMan Take a look at these 2 articles: blog.gauffin.org/2012/10/griffin-decoupled-the-queries and cuttingedge.it/blogs/steven/pivot/entry.php?id=92 –  david.s Jan 21 '13 at 7:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted
+500

Disclaimer: Since there aren't any great answers yet, I decided to post a part from a great blog post I read a while ago, copied almost verbatim. You can find the full blog post here. So here it is:


We can define the following two interfaces:

public interface IQuery<TResult>
{
}

public interface IQueryHandler<TQuery, TResult> where TQuery : IQuery<TResult>
{
    TResult Handle(TQuery query);
}

The IQuery<TResult> specifies a message that defines a specific query with the data it returns using the TResult generic type. With the previously defined interface we can define a query message like this:

public class FindUsersBySearchTextQuery : IQuery<User[]>
{
    public string SearchText { get; set; }
    public bool IncludeInactiveUsers { get; set; }
}

This class defines a query operation with two parameters, which will result in an array of User objects. The class that handles this message can be defined as follows:

public class FindUsersBySearchTextQueryHandler
    : IQueryHandler<FindUsersBySearchTextQuery, User[]>
{
    private readonly NorthwindUnitOfWork db;

    public FindUsersBySearchTextQueryHandler(NorthwindUnitOfWork db)
    {
        this.db = db;
    }

    public User[] Handle(FindUsersBySearchTextQuery query)
    {
        return db.Users.Where(x => x.Name.Contains(query.SearchText)).ToArray();
    }
}

We can now let consumers depend upon the generic IQueryHandler interface:

public class UserController : Controller
{
    IQueryHandler<FindUsersBySearchTextQuery, User[]> findUsersBySearchTextHandler;

    public UserController(
        IQueryHandler<FindUsersBySearchTextQuery, User[]> findUsersBySearchTextHandler)
    {
        this.findUsersBySearchTextHandler = findUsersBySearchTextHandler;
    }

    public View SearchUsers(string searchString)
    {
        var query = new FindUsersBySearchTextQuery
        {
            SearchText = searchString,
            IncludeInactiveUsers = false
        };

        User[] users = this.findUsersBySearchTextHandler.Handle(query);    
        return View(users);
    }
}

Immediately this model gives us a lot of flexibility, because we can now decide what to inject into the UserController. We can inject a completely different implementation, or one that wraps the real implementation, without having to make changes to the UserController (and all other consumers of that interface).

The IQuery<TResult> interface gives us compile-time support when specifying or injecting IQueryHandlers in our code. When we change the FindUsersBySearchTextQuery to return UserInfo[] instead (by implementing IQuery<UserInfo[]>), the UserController will fail to compile, since the generic type constraint on IQueryHandler<TQuery, TResult> won't be able to map FindUsersBySearchTextQuery to User[].

Injecting the IQueryHandler interface into a consumer however, has some less obvious problems that still need to be addressed. The number of dependencies of our consumers might get too big and can lead to constructor over-injection - when a constructor takes too many arguments. The number of queries a class executes can change frequently, which would require constant changes into the number of constructor arguments.

We can fix the problem of having to inject too many IQueryHandlers with an extra layer of abstraction. We create a mediator that sits between the consumers and the query handlers:

public interface IQueryProcessor
{
    TResult Process<TResult>(IQuery<TResult> query);
}

The IQueryProcessor is a non-generic interface with one generic method. As you can see in the interface definition, the IQueryProcessor depends on the IQuery<TResult> interface. This allows us to have compile time support in our consumers that depend on the IQueryProcessor. Let's rewrite the UserController to use the new IQueryProcessor:

public class UserController : Controller
{
    private IQueryProcessor queryProcessor;

    public UserController(IQueryProcessor queryProcessor)
    {
        this.queryProcessor = queryProcessor;
    }

    public View SearchUsers(string searchString)
    {
        var query = new FindUsersBySearchTextQuery
        {
            SearchText = searchString,
            IncludeInactiveUsers = false
        };

        // Note how we omit the generic type argument,
        // but still have type safety.
        User[] users = this.queryProcessor.Process(query);

        return this.View(users);
    }
}

The UserController now depends on a IQueryProcessor that can handle all of our queries. The UserController's SearchUsers method calls the IQueryProcessor.Process method passing in an initialized query object. Since the FindUsersBySearchTextQuery implements the IQuery<User[]> interface, we can pass it to the generic Execute<TResult>(IQuery<TResult> query) method. Thanks to C# type inference, the compiler is able to determine the generic type and this saves us having to explicitly state the type. The return type of the Process method is also known.

It is now the responsibility of the implementation of the IQueryProcessor to find the right IQueryHandler. This requires some dynamic typing, and optionally the use of a Dependency Injection framework, and can all be done with just a few lines of code:

sealed class QueryProcessor : IQueryProcessor
{
    private readonly Container container;

    public QueryProcessor(Container container)
    {
        this.container = container;
    }

    [DebuggerStepThrough]
    public TResult Process<TResult>(IQuery<TResult> query)
    {
        var handlerType = typeof(IQueryHandler<,>)
            .MakeGenericType(query.GetType(), typeof(TResult));

        dynamic handler = container.GetInstance(handlerType);

        return handler.Handle((dynamic)query);
    }
}

The QueryProcessor class constructs a specific IQueryHandler<TQuery, TResult> type based on the type of the supplied query instance. This type is used to ask the supplied container class to get an instance of that type. Unfortunately we need to call the Handle method using reflection (by using the C# 4.0 dymamic keyword in this case), because at this point it is impossible to cast the handler instance, since the generic TQuery argument is not available at compile time. However, unless the Handle method is renamed or gets other arguments, this call will never fail and if you want to, it is very easy to write a unit test for this class. Using reflection will give a slight drop, but is nothing to really worry about.


To answer one of your concerns:

So I'm looking for alternatives that encapsulate the entire query, but still flexible enough that you're not just swapping spaghetti Repositories for an explosion of command classes.

A consequence of using this design is that there will be a lot of small classes in the system, but having a lot of small/focused classes (with clear names) is a good thing. This approach is clearly much better then having many overloads with different parameters for the same method in a repository, as you can group those in one query class. So you still get a lot less query classes than methods in a repository.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like you get the award. I do like the concepts, I was just hoping for someone to present something truly different. Congrats. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 29 '13 at 3:07
    
@MystereMan Thank you for awarding me the bounty. I don't think you will find something trully different. I wrestle with the same problem as you do and all the solutions I found are variations on the same theme. You just have to pick and choose what you like and adapt it to your own needs. –  david.s Jan 29 '13 at 7:12
    
I've tried this solution a year ago - it's all good in simple examples (like this one). But when you try integrate this solution with real world web app which has more than 5 different queries it leads to constructor overinjection. You can pack and hide them behind another class and inject it but then again you can do the same with repository methods. –  Michael Logutov Jul 23 '13 at 10:47
1  
@FuriCuri, does a single class really need 5 queries? Perhaps you could look at that as being a class with too many responsibilities. Alternatively, if the queries are being aggregated then maybe they should actually be a single query. These are just suggestions, of course. –  Sam Oct 1 '13 at 3:03
1  
@stakx You're absolutely right that in my initial example the generic TResult parameter of the IQuery interface is not useful. However, in my updated response, the TResult parameter is used by the Process method of the IQueryProcessor to resolve the IQueryHandler at runtime. –  david.s Oct 14 '13 at 8:47

My way of dealing with that is actually simplistic and ORM agnostic. My view for a repository is this: The repository's job is to provide the app with the model required for the context, so the app just asks the repo for what it wants but doesn't tell it how to get it.

I supply the repository method with a Criteria (yes, DDD style), which will be used by the repo to create the query (or whatever is required - it may be a webservice request). Joins and groups imho are details of how, not the what and a criteria should be only the base to build a where clause.

Model = the final object or data structure neede by the app.

public class MyCriteria
{
   public Guid Id {get;set;}
   public string Name {get;set;}
    //etc
 }

 public interface Repository
  {
       MyModel GetModel(Expression<Func<MyCriteria,bool>> criteria);
   }

Probably you can use the ORM criteria (Nhibernate) directly if you want it. The repository implementation should know how to use the Criteria with the underlying storage or DAO.

I don't know your domain and the model requirements but it would be strange if the best way is that the app to build the query itself. The model changes so much that you can't define something stable?

This solution clearly requires some additional code but it doesn't couple the rest of the to an ORM or whatever you're using to access the storage. The repository does its job to act as a facade and IMO it's clean and the 'criteria translation' code is reusable

share|improve this answer
    
This does not address the problems of repository growth, and having an ever expanding list of methods to return various kinds of data. I understand you may not see a problem with this (many people don't), but others see it differently (I suggest reading the article I linked to, there are lots of other people with similar opinions). –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 21 '13 at 8:39
1  
I does address it, because the criteria makes lots of methods unnecessary. Of course, not of all of them I can't say much without knowing anything about the ting you need. I'm under the impresson though that you want to query directly the db so, probably a repository is just in the way. If you need to work direclty with the relational sotrage, go for it directly, no need for a repository. And as a note, it's annoying how many people quote Ayende with that post. I don't agree with it and I think that many devs are just using the pattern the wrong way. –  MikeSW Jan 21 '13 at 9:16
1  
It may reduce the problem somewhat, but given a large enough application it will still create monster repositories. I don't agree with Ayende's solution of using nHibernate directly in the main logic, but I do agree with him about the absurdity of out of control repository growth. I'm not wanting to directly query the database, but I don't just want to move the problem from a repository to an explosion of query objects either. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 21 '13 at 9:46

You can use a fluent interface. The basic idea is that methods of a class return the current instance this very class after having performed some action. This allows you to chain method calls.

By creating an appropriate class hierarchy, you can create a logical flow of accessible methods.

public class FinalQuery
{
    protected string _table;
    protected string[] _selectFields;
    protected string _where;
    protected string[] _groupBy;
    protected string _having;
    protected string[] _orderByDescending;
    protected string[] _orderBy;

    protected FinalQuery()
    {
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        var sb = new StringBuilder("SELECT ");
        AppendFields(sb, _selectFields);
        sb.AppendLine();

        sb.Append("FROM ");
        sb.Append("[").Append(_table).AppendLine("]");

        if (_where != null) {
            sb.Append("WHERE").AppendLine(_where);
        }

        if (_groupBy != null) {
            sb.Append("GROUP BY ");
            AppendFields(sb, _groupBy);
            sb.AppendLine();
        }

        if (_having != null) {
            sb.Append("HAVING").AppendLine(_having);
        }

        if (_orderBy != null) {
            sb.Append("ORDER BY ");
            AppendFields(sb, _orderBy);
            sb.AppendLine();
        } else if (_orderByDescending != null) {
            sb.Append("ORDER BY ");
            AppendFields(sb, _orderByDescending);
            sb.Append(" DESC").AppendLine();
        }

        return sb.ToString();
    }

    private static void AppendFields(StringBuilder sb, string[] fields)
    {
        foreach (string field in fields) {
            sb.Append(field).Append(", ");
        }
        sb.Length -= 2;
    }
}

public class GroupedQuery : FinalQuery
{
    protected GroupedQuery()
    {
    }

    public GroupedQuery Having(string condition)
    {
        if (_groupBy == null) {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("HAVING clause without GROUP BY clause");
        }
        if (_having == null) {
            _having = " (" + condition + ")";
        } else {
            _having += " AND (" + condition + ")";
        }
        return this;
    }

    public FinalQuery OrderBy(params string[] fields)
    {
        _orderBy = fields;
        return this;
    }

    public FinalQuery OrderByDescending(params string[] fields)
    {
        _orderByDescending = fields;
        return this;
    }
}

public class Query : GroupedQuery
{
    public Query(string table, params string[] selectFields)
    {
        _table = table;
        _selectFields = selectFields;
    }

    public Query Where(string condition)
    {
        if (_where == null) {
            _where = " (" + condition + ")";
        } else {
            _where += " AND (" + condition + ")";
        }
        return this;
    }

    public GroupedQuery GroupBy(params string[] fields)
    {
        _groupBy = fields;
        return this;
    }
}

You would call it like this

string query = new Query("myTable", "name", "SUM(amount) AS total")
    .Where("name LIKE 'A%'")
    .GroupBy("name")
    .Having("COUNT(*) > 2")
    .OrderBy("name")
    .ToString();

You can only create a new instance of Query. The other classes have a protected constructor. The point of the hierarchy is to "disable" methods. For instance, the GroupBy method returns a GroupedQuery which is the base class of Query and does not have a Where method (the where method is declared in Query). Therefore it is not possible to call Where after GroupBy.

It is however not perfect. With this class hierarchy you can successively hide members, but not show new ones. Therefore Having throws an exception when it is called before GroupBy.

Note that it is possible to call Where several times. This adds new conditions with an AND to the existing conditions. This makes it easier to construct filters programmatically from single conditions. The same is possible with Having.

The methods accepting field lists have a parameter params string[] fields. It allows you to either pass single field names or a string array.


Fluent interfaces are very flexible and do not require you to create a lot of overloads of methods with different combinations of parameters. My example works with strings, however the approach can be extended to other types. You could also declare predefined methods for special cases or methods accepting custom types. You could also add methods like ExecuteReader or ExceuteScalar<T>. This would allow you to define queries like this

var reader = new Query<Employee>(new MonthlyReportFields{ IncludeSalary = true })
    .Where(new CurrentMonthCondition())
    .Where(new DivisionCondition{ DivisionType = DivisionType.Production})
    .OrderBy(new StandardMonthlyReportSorting())
    .ExecuteReader();
share|improve this answer
2  
Hmm.. Interesting, but your solution appears to have problems with SQL Injection possibilities, and doesn't really create prepared statements for pre-compiled execution (thus performing more slowly). It could probably be adapted to fix those problems, but then we're stuck with the non-type safe dataset results and what not. I would prefer an ORM based solution, and perhaps I should specify that explicitly. This is essentially duplicating the functionality of Linq without all the benefits you get from Linq. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 20 '13 at 2:34
    
I'm aware of these problems. This is just a quick and dirty solution, showing how a fluent interface can be constructed. In a real world solution you would probably “bake” your existing approach into a fluent interface adapted to your needs. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 20 '13 at 16:33

I've done this, supported this and undone this.

The major problem is this: no matter how you do it, the added abstraction does not gain you independence. It will leak by definition. In essence, you're inventing an entire layer just to make your code look cute... but it does not reduce maintenance, improve readability or gain you any type of model agnosticism.

The fun part is that you answered your own question in response to Olivier's response: "this is essentially duplicating the functionality of Linq without all the benefits you get from Linq".

Ask yourself: how could it not be?

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I've definitely experienced the problems of integrating Linq into your business layer. It is very powerful, but when we make data model changes it's a nightmare. Things are improved with repositories, because I can make the changes in a localized place without affecting the business layer much (other than when you have to also change the business layer to support the changes). But, repositories become these bloated layers that violate SRP massively. I understand your point, but it doesn't really solve any problems either. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 28 '13 at 20:06
    
If your data layer uses LINQ, and data model changes require changes to your business layer... you're not layering properly. –  Stu Jan 28 '13 at 22:11
    
I thought you were saying you no longer added that layer. When you say the added abstraction doesn't gain you anything, that implies you are in agreement with Ayende about passing the nHibernate session (or EF context) directly into your business layer. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 28 '13 at 22:30

My apologies if I'm way off the mark here. I'm thinking through "de-repositorizing" an application currently. And, although I'm not entirely familiar with all of the patterns and frameworks you mentioned, I figured I'd make a few basic recommendations based on where my thinking and testing has led me so far (in case my simpler, less tainted (... ok, less educated) mind is helpful here).

First

Make your classes (or DAL subclasses) self-aware. That is, make them sub-classes or implementations of a DataObject class or interface that insists they be able to identify, serialize, and deserialize their columns and relationship. This can get pretty complex, you can leverage a mapping tool or library; but it could also be relatively simple:

interface IDataObject {
  Dictionary<String, String> ToDictionary();
  void Populate(Dictionary d);
  void Populate(IDataReader r);
  static DataDefinition Definition;
  DataDefinition Definition;
} // interface IDataObject

public class DataDefinition {
  public String Table;
  public Dictionary<String, DbType> Columns;
  public List<DataDefinition> Parents;
  public List<DataDefinition> Children;
} // class DataDefinition

public class User : IDataObject {
  public Int32 UserID;
  public String Name;
  public List<Comment> Comments;

  public void Populate(Dictionary<String, Object> d) {
    UserID = Convert.ToInt32(d["user_id"]);
    Name = d["username"];
  }

  public void Populate(IDataReader r) {
    while (r.Read()) {
      Dictionary<String, String> row = SomeMagicIDataReaderToDictionaryMethod(r);

    }
  }

  public Dictionary<String, String> ToDictionary() {
    return new Dictionary<String, String>() {
      {"user_id", UserID},
      {"username", Name}
    }
  }

  public static DataDefinition Definition = new DataDefinition() {
    DataEntity = "users",
    Fields = new Dictionary<String, DbType>() {
      "user_id", DbType.Int,
      "username", DbType.String
    },
    Children = new List<DataDefinition>() {
      Comment.Definition
    }
  }

  public DataDefinition Definition
  {
    get {
      return User.Definition;
    }
  }

} // class User

Second

In general, only fetch the "main" entity of interest. That is, don't use any form of magic to fetch Comments for each user fetched; you don't know if you need them yet! Use singletons. And create static multi-relationship-population as-necessary. Whether these multi-get methods live on the parent or the child will be determined primarily by how you understand the relationship:

public class User : IDataObject {

  ...

  public List<Comment> _Comments;
  public List<Comment> Comments {
    get {
      if (_Comments == null) {
        LoadComments(new List<User> { this });
      }
      return _Comments;
    }
  }

  // we want to be able to populate comments for LIST of users all at once,
  // if necessary. but, we can all use our generalized method to populate them
  // for a single user, keeping any user-comment specific fetching logic in one place.
  public static Boolean LoadComments(List<User> users) {

    Dictionary<Int32, User> index = new Dictionary<Int32, User>();
    foreach (User u in users) {
      index.Add(u.UserID, user);
    }

    ...

    using (IDataReader r = <whatever>) {
      while (r.Read()) {
        Dictionary<String, String> row = SomeMagicIDataReaderToDictionaryMethod(r);        
        Int32 userID = Convert.ToInt32(row["user_id"]);
        Comment c = (new Comment()).Populate(row);
        if (index[userID].Comments == null) {
          index[userID].Comments = new List<Comments>();
        }
        index[userID].Comments.Add(c);
      }
    }
  }

  ...

}

Third

Write parametized SQL (or JSON, or XML, other syntax, or execute the appropriate data or API calls) based on a definition and one of either a context (a bunch of related objects) or parameters.

So, we make a "simple" DataEngine, or we find one, or we extend one ... or whatever.

class DataEngine {

  // our workhorse takes in a definition -- the thing we're looking for.
  public static List<T> Query<T>(List<IDataObject> context) where T : IDataObject, new() {
    List<T> rv = new List<T>();
    IDataReader r;

    if (context.Count > 0) {
      // the exact details of what this does will probably differ based on the
      // underlying data engine, query engine, and frameworks you're using.
      // but in essence, because our DataObjects have DataDefinitions that refer
      // to each other, we can perform an arbitrarily limited BFS to
      // produce an ordered JOIN() list of some sort.

      List<DataDefinition> entities = new List<String>() {
        T.Definition
      };
      Dictionary<String, Object> conditions = new Dictionary<String, Object>();
      List<SqlParameter> parameters = new List<SqlParameter>();

      foreach (DataObject o in context) {
        // special case
        if (o.Definition == T.Definition) {
          // T.Definition is already there.
          // some special casing is necessarily to account for T.Definition's containing
          // a Parent or Children that are of the same type.
          Dictionary<String, Object> c = o.ToDictionary();
          foreach (KeyValuePair p in c) {
            if (p.Value != null) {
              conditions.Add(p);
              parameters.Add(new SqlParameter(<whatever>));
            }
          }
        } else {
          // BFS for link between o.Definition and T.Definition
          <search and add definitions to entities>;

          Dictionary<String, Object> c = o.ToDictionary();
          foreach (KeyValuePair p in c) {
            if (p.Value != null) {
              conditions.Add(p);
              parameters.Add(new SqlParameter(<whatever>));
            }
          }
        }
      }

      IQuery q = <joined entity clauses> + <joined parametized conditions>;
      q.IterativelyAppendSqlParameters(parameters);
      r = q.Execute();
    } else {
      // construct query based on definition to grab ALL objects ... 
      IQuery q = <whatever>;
      r = q.Execute();
    }

    while (r.Read()) {
      T row = new T();
      row.Populate(SomeMagicIDataReaderToDictionaryMethod(r));
      rv.Add(row);
    }

    return rv;

  } // static Query()

} // class DataEngine

Basic request:

List<User> loggedInUser = DataEngine.Query(
  // template user -- find a user that matches the non-null, non-zero fields here
  new User() {
    Name = "Bob Jones"
  }
);

More complicated request:

// in this case, we assume User.Definition contains a reference to
// Comment.Definition (and possibly vice versa) which is linked to
// Item.Definition (and possibly vice versa).
// DataEngine.Query searches the definitions for a path and builds the query.
List<Item> itemsUserHasCommentedOn = DataEngine.Query(
  // a list of related items, without saying *how* they're related.
  new List<DataObject>() { loggedInUser }
);

As a corollary to a solution like this, your IDataObject shouldn't do anything "meaningful" upon instantiation. There may be a way to get around that, but my relatively inexperience is preventing me from seeing it.

Fourth

Don't pretend, especially in large projects, that you'll never end up with a repository of specialized queries. Automagic data binding strategies are almost never smart enough to apply your quirky encyclopedic knowledge of the data or the optimizations you'll need in 6 months. And in some cases, it's easier to just write the specific query you need, rather than to hack a magical system to work appropriately with your wonky data.

Disclaimer

I'm not half as .NET-experienced the other .NET developers here. (Perl and PHP background, mostly.) So, I'm not terribly familiar with the plethora of .NET data-access patterns and frameworks out there. What I've given here is a general (and possibly naive) path I had intended to go down at my current job to fend off the heap of absurdly-specific, and very sensitive DAL + stored procedures I've inherited.

In other words, if this is terrible or entirely missing the point. Please be gentle ...

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I see this solution as being similar to Olivier's answer, with the addition of forcing each entity to "know itself" a little bit, and the suggestion of using a BFS of that knowledge to build complex queries with minimal input. I.e., get me a list of Type X within the context of Object A of Type Y. –  svidgen Jan 28 '13 at 23:00
    
Yes, I'm not really looking for a new data access technology, i'm looking for a reasonable interface between business and data layers, which is what a repository typically is, but they tend to become monstrosities. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 28 '13 at 23:52
    
Sure. This is intended to sit under the business layer. The DataEngine may or may not also be the data layer. More importantly, it manipulates the data later based on the "self awareness" of the requested Type and "conditions" or query objects. I.e., give me all the x of type y that are some way related to objects a, b, c ,etc.. –  svidgen Jan 29 '13 at 0:23
    
But, perhaps that fails on the "reasonability" requirement. It could be unpredictable if many relationships exist that could link type a to type b. –  svidgen Jan 29 '13 at 0:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.