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I am learning the way to use ordinary pipeline in linux for the communication between parent and child process. The basic task is just to send a message to the child process from parent process, and then the child do some conversion and pass the result back to the parent. My result shown is some random character like ���. I have been contemplating for a long while and still couldn't figure out the bug. Thanks for your help.

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define READ_END 0
#define WRITE_END 1

void convert(char* str);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
  int pid; /* Process ID */
  int status;
  char *input;
  char *read_msg_c;
  char *read_msg_p;
  int pfd1[2], pfd2[2];
  if (argc !=2){/* argc should be 2 for correct execution */
    /* We print argv[0] assuming it is the program name */
    printf("Please provide the string for conversion \n");
    exit(-1);
  }
  input = argv[1];

  if(pipe(pfd1) < 0 || pipe(pfd2) < 0){
    printf("Failed to create a pipe between parent and child \n");
    exit(-1);
  }
  if((pid = fork()) < 0){ /* Fork the process */
     printf("Fork error \n");
     exit(-1);
  }
  else if(pid > 0){ /* Parent code */
    close(pfd1[READ_END]);
    close(pfd2[WRITE_END]);
    printf("Process ID of the parent is %d. \n", getpid()); /* Print parent's process ID */
    write(pfd1[WRITE_END],input,strlen(input)+1);
    close(pfd1[WRITE_END]);

    read(pfd2[READ_END],read_msg_p,strlen(input)+1);
    printf("%s\n",read_msg_p);
    close(pfd2[READ_END]);
  }
  else if(pid == 0){ /* Child code */
    close(pfd1[WRITE_END]);
    close(pfd2[READ_END]);

    printf("Process ID of the child is %d. \n", getpid()); /* Print child's process ID */
    read(pfd1[READ_END],read_msg_c, strlen(input)+1);
    printf("Child: Reversed the case of the received string. \n");
    write(pfd2[WRITE_END],read_msg_c,strlen(input)+1);
    close(pfd1[READ_END]);
    close(pfd2[WRITE_END]);
    exit(0); /* Child exits */
   }
}

void convert(char *str){
  int i = 0;
  while (str[i]){
    if (isupper(str[i])){
      str[i] = tolower(str[i]);
    }
    else if (islower(str[i])){
      str[i] = toupper(str[i]);
    }
    i++;
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why include convert when it is not called? –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 20 '13 at 0:26
    
You should check that your writes are successful, and also validate how many characters your reads receive. Without know that, you can't reliably use the read data. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 20 '13 at 0:27
    
@JonathanLeffler I forgot to copy the line that calls convert. I already tried to debug it, the pipeline pfd1(for sending data from parent to children) doesn't seem to be working either. The character received from child process is just gibberish. Thank you –  zsljulius Jan 20 '13 at 0:35
    
read(pfd2[READ_END],read_msg_p,strlen(input)+1); The reader cannot know the length. –  wildplasser Jan 20 '13 at 0:41
    
@wildplasser: the child can because it was an argument to the main() program which was only forked, not exec'd. In general, it can't; in this specific case, it can. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 20 '13 at 0:42
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your primary bug is that your variables read_msg_p and read_msg_c are uninitialized pointers.

Make them into arrays:

char read_msg_p[1024];
char read_msg_c[1024];

You seem to be missing <stdio.h> (but you don't really need <sys/types.h> any more). You should error check your reads and writes; your reads will probably use a different maximum size once you've allocated the space for them. Etc.

I spotted the problem by looking at the compiler warnings:

$ gcc -O3 -g -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra pipes-14420398.c -o pipes-14420398
pipes-14420398.c: In function ‘main’:
pipes-14420398.c:40:22: warning: ‘read_msg_p’ may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]
pipes-14420398.c:52:22: warning: ‘read_msg_c’ may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]
$

Ignore the line numbers; I'd moderately seriously hacked your code by the time these were the only warnings left. But the lines in question are the read() calls.


Example output form the hacked code, working correctly.

$ ./pipes-14420398 string-to-convert
Process ID of the parent is 37327. 
Process ID of the child is 37328. 
Child read 18 bytes: <<string-to-convert>>
Parent read 18 bytes: <<string-to-convert>>
$

Note that the code below reads 18 bytes (including the null), but does not print the null (because of the nbytes-1 argument to printf().

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define READ_END 0
#define WRITE_END 1


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int pid; /* Process ID */
  char *input;
  char read_msg_c[1024];
  char read_msg_p[1024];
  int pfd1[2], pfd2[2];

  if (argc !=2){/* argc should be 2 for correct execution */
    /* We print argv[0] assuming it is the program name */
    fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s string-to-convert\n", argv[0]);
    exit(-1);
  }
  input = argv[1];

  if(pipe(pfd1) < 0 || pipe(pfd2) < 0){
    printf("Failed to create a pipe between parent and child \n");
    exit(-1);
  }
  if((pid = fork()) < 0){ /* Fork the process */
     printf("Fork error \n");
     exit(-1);
  }
  else if(pid > 0){ /* Parent code */
    close(pfd1[READ_END]);
    close(pfd2[WRITE_END]);
    printf("Process ID of the parent is %d. \n", getpid()); /* Print parent's process ID */
    write(pfd1[WRITE_END], input, strlen(input)+1);
    close(pfd1[WRITE_END]);

    int nbytes = read(pfd2[READ_END], read_msg_p, sizeof(read_msg_p));
    if (nbytes <= 0)
        printf("Parent: read failed\n");
    else
        printf("Parent read %d bytes: <<%.*s>>\n", nbytes, nbytes-1, read_msg_p);
    close(pfd2[READ_END]);
  }
  else if(pid == 0){ /* Child code */
    close(pfd1[WRITE_END]);
    close(pfd2[READ_END]);

    printf("Process ID of the child is %d. \n", getpid()); /* Print child's process ID */
    int nbytes = read(pfd1[READ_END], read_msg_c, sizeof(read_msg_c));
    if (nbytes <= 0)
        printf("Child: read failed\n");
    else
    {
        printf("Child read %d bytes: <<%.*s>>\n", nbytes, nbytes-1, read_msg_c); 
        write(pfd2[WRITE_END], read_msg_c, nbytes);
    }
    close(pfd1[READ_END]);
    close(pfd2[WRITE_END]);
    exit(0); /* Child exits */
   }
}

As noted by WhozCraig, there are numerous other changes that could be made. This, however, gets things working reasonably cleanly. You were very close to OK.

Note the debugging techniques:

  1. Compile with high warning levels and fix all warnings.
  2. Print information as it becomes available (or run in a debugger and observe the information as it becomes available).
share|improve this answer
    
+1 and along those lines, why have two buffers at all. Each process has its own. char msg[1024]; used in each process should suffice. –  WhozCraig Jan 20 '13 at 0:39
    
@WhozCraig: yes, and the buffers could be local to the blocks of code where they're used, and ... –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 20 '13 at 0:43
    
You are amazing! I changed my initialization from NULL to a specified buffer size and it works! Thanks for your help! –  zsljulius Jan 20 '13 at 0:48
    
@WhozCraig You have a very good point, since when we fork, the address space is automatically copied into the child process. I will make the changes. Thank you! –  zsljulius Jan 20 '13 at 1:08
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