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I accept onathan Wakely's comment as answer. Thank you! The below is original post.

[original post] Have an idea about making set and get methods in a class automatically as shown below

template<class T>
class Has
{
public:
    template<class U>
    const U& get() const;

    template<>
    const T& get<T>() const
    {
        return m_t;
    }

    template<class U>
    void set(const U& t);

    template<>
    void set<T>(const T& t)
    {
        m_t = t;
    }

private:
    T m_t;
};

An example

class Door {};
class Window {};

class House
    : public Has<Door>
    , public Has<Window>
{};

House house;

// set
house.set(Door());
house.set(Window());

// get
const Door& door = house.get<Door>();
const Window& window = house.get<Window>();

If the components' types are different and their type names are readable, the code shown above is fine. But if the type name is not readable, such as the area of the house has a type double, I'd like to use

house.get<Area>(); // or
house.get<AREA>(); // where the template argument can be a const integer

other than

house.get<double>();

And if there are two components with double type, such as area and volume, how to deal with the complex? Thanks a lot!

There is a way to wrap the double as a new type like

template<class T>
class Wrap
{
public:
    Wrap(const T& value = T())
        : m_value
    {}

    operator T()
    {
        return m_value;
    }

private:
    T m_value;
};

class Area
    : public Wrap<double>
{};

To doing this, is there any performance affection? Thanks.

Following jweyrich's suggestion, add the following code

template<class Name, class T>
class With
{
public:
    template<class U>
    const U& get() const;

    template<>
    const T& get<Name>() const
    {
        return m_t;
    }

    template<class U>
    void set(const U& t);

    template<>
    void set<Name>(const T& t)
    {
        m_t = t;
    }

private:
    T m_t;
};

I think this work perfectly.

An example

class Door {};
class Window {};

class Area {};    // Empty, just a name holder
class Volume {};  // Another a name holder

class House
    : public Has<Door>
    , public Has<Window>
    , public With<Area, double>
    , public With<Volume, double>
{};

House house;

// set
house.set(Door());
house.set(Window());
house.set<Area>(3000);
house.set<Volume>(30000);

// get
const Door& door = house.get<Door>();
const Window& window = house.get<Window>();
double area = house.get<Area>();
double volume = house.get<Volume>();

Any one know for the template inheritance, is there any performance reduction? In my opinion, I think there is not. Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
1  
One workaround might be to use typedefs, e.g. typedef double area. Although this is slightly awkward. –  Gordon Bailey Jan 20 '13 at 0:38
    
How about having two double components? Thanks. –  user1899020 Jan 20 '13 at 0:44
1  
@user1899020 as suggested by Gordon, you can use typedefs to accomplish that. I believe this chat history (check earlier messages) might give you an insight. –  jweyrich Jan 20 '13 at 1:13
2  
Why do you want getters and setters? If you're going to do that, just have public members and access them by name. Instead of house.get<Door>() just say house.door –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 20 '13 at 2:44
2  
Poor design and bad habits. They are useful if you want to hide the detail of a member and be able to change its implementation, but that doesn't apply in your case because the member and the implementation are all generic and provided by the base class template. –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 20 '13 at 2:51

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