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I am new to both C# and XAML and I am making some sort of reading application.

So I need a TextBlock that word wraps if the title needs more than 1 row to fit. But when it becomes more that 2 rows to fit, wrap a ScrollView on it.

By doing this I could align the rest element tightly whenever it is either 1 or 2(max) row height.

How do I achieve this in XAML or C#?

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1 Answer 1

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If you can use a TextBox instead of a TextBlock, it would be easier. A TextBox supports scrolling and has a LineCount property that you can key off of. So for example, I put the a few controls into a StackPanel:

<Grid>
    <StackPanel HorizontalAlignment="Left" Height="100" Margin="105,127,0,0" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="184">
        <TextBox Height="23" TextWrapping="Wrap" Text="TextBox" Name="TextBox1"/>
        <Button Content="Button" Click="Button_Click_2"/>
    </StackPanel>
</Grid>

Then I had some code to update the text. When I hit 2 lines, I grew the TextBox and when I got to three lines, I added scrollbars:

private void Button_Click_2(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    TextBox1.Text += "More Text";

    if (TextBox1.LineCount >= 2)
    {
        TextBox1.Height = 38; 
    }
    if (TextBox1.LineCount >= 3)
    {
        TextBox1.VerticalScrollBarVisibility = ScrollBarVisibility.Visible;
    }
}
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But the TextBox an input controls. How am I suppose to deal with that? –  user1510539 Jan 20 '13 at 3:40
    
Depending on what you need to do, IsReadOnly="True" might be enough. Otherwise, there are lots of examples online on how to format a textbox in a variety of different ways. –  John Koerner Jan 20 '13 at 3:46
    
So is it possible to format it exactly like TextBlock? And what about the performance? –  user1510539 Jan 20 '13 at 5:17
    
@user1510539 I don't know your requirements for look and feel, but you can do all sorts of things in WPF to make a textbox look how you want. A quick google search returns this and this –  John Koerner Jan 20 '13 at 12:35
    
Thanks, as a substitute. That met my requirements:) –  user1510539 Jan 21 '13 at 0:23

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