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In this loop, I am iterating through an ArrayList of type Entity, which contains objects of type Entity as well as objects of type Projectile, which extends Entity. I want the below code to be executed if the object is an instance of Projectile. However, the getVelocity() method is only in the subclass Projectile, and not in Entity. So I am unable to compile the below code.

I can think of ways to work around this, such as using separate ArrayLists. However, the point was to keep all Entities within a global list rather than separate them. Is there a simple solution to this problem, or do I need to change the structure of my code?

for (Entity f: glo.getList()) {
           if (f instanceof Projectile)
              f.setX(f.getVelocity()/rawFPS);
        }
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to cast it as a Projectile for it to compile. Try this:

for (Entity f: glo.getList()) {
           if (f instanceof Projectile)
              f.setX(((Projectile)f).getVelocity()/rawFPS);
        }

This happens because java always checks the type that an object is declared as; In your case this is Entity.

You may want to add a @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") so that your IDE and anyone that reads your code knows that the unchecked cast is intentional.

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This seems to be a loop that updates your entities in some way every tick of your game engine.

In my opinion, a cleaner solution would be:

class Entity {
  ...
  public void update() {}
  ...
}

class Projectile extends Entity {
  ...
  @Override
  public void update() {
    setX(velocity/rawFPS);
  }
  ...
}

I don't know your architecture, you may or may not need to pass rawFPS to update(). (as @Naveen quite rightly pointed out, this is not very clean, so avoid it if you can). Also, if your Entity is abstract with no functionality on its own, consider making it an interface in the first place.

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2  
+1 This is a good object-oriented approach. Let the objects update/render themselves when they know how to and they can benefit by using internal/non-standard API if necessary. –  Marc Baumbach Jan 20 '13 at 3:03
    
I hadn't thought about having independent update methods. I'll look into whether it's feasible or not given the rest of my code. –  Wolfram Jan 20 '13 at 3:05
    
Hmm... passing rawFPS to all entities smells a bit odd since most Entitys will ignore it. –  Navin Jan 20 '13 at 3:10
    
@Navin Well, that depends. In a game, most entities that have to be updated are updated based on the time that has passed, so really most of them will need rawFPS. But I agree with you: It's best to avoid that if you can. –  us2012 Jan 20 '13 at 3:11
1  
Pass the updater and use a type-specific callback. This will make it a double-dispatch pretty close to visitor pattern. –  Don Roby Jan 20 '13 at 3:21

even if(f instanceof Projectile) is true your reference is of type Entity which has no clue what you declared in your subclass and so the compilation failure

provide the blank method in Entity class with same signature and than override it in sub class and remove instanceof check, if that fits on your class model

or

use casting

if(f instanceof Projectile){
  ((Projectile)f).setX(..);
}
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Entity should really be an interface, with a getVelocity() method defined on it. Of course you can hack around the issue and cast, but ask yourself what the right logical model is for what you're building.

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Downvoter care to comment? –  Amir Afghani Jan 20 '13 at 3:04
    
I am not the downvoter, but I would guess that it is because an Entity may not have a velocity so it does not make sense to give it a getVelocity(). –  Navin Jan 20 '13 at 3:17

Seriously, Guys? instance of sucks. Every guide on Java tells you that.

There's something wrong here: you are looping through a set of entities and altering the internal state of a subset (the subclass instances) using another data item: FPS. If you don't have the FPS when the Projectile is constructed, having this outer class inject it later seems kind of random. Might be cleaner to just call a set on the FPS and have the update of the positional occur then.

The outer class should probably ask for just the Projectiles.

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1  
instance of sucks really? This question is exactly the kind of situation where you use instance of. –  Navin Jan 20 '13 at 3:03
1  
I tend to agree with Rob, instanceof does suck. I didn't address that portion in my answer. –  Amir Afghani Jan 20 '13 at 3:04
1  
Well... why instance of suck? –  Wolfram Jan 20 '13 at 3:06
    
Because it's not object oriented. If you're using instance of, your model is flawed. –  Amir Afghani Jan 20 '13 at 3:08
    
Second link, dude: javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=31 from Google. –  Rob Jan 20 '13 at 3:21

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