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I have some code that looks like this

class Split
{
public:
    Split(Hand *pcHand = NULL)
        : phand(pcHand), phandsplit(pcHand)
     {
     }

    int CardOne;
    int CardTwo;
    int CardThree;

    void getCardOne(Hand & phand)
    {
        CardOne = phand.SendCOneToSplit();
        std::cout << "Card One: " << CardOne << std::endl;
    }

    void getCardTwo(Hand & phandsplit)
    {
        CardTwo = phandsplit.SendCOneToSplit();
        std::cout << "Card Two: " << CardTwo << std::endl;
    }

    void getCardThree(Hand & phandsplitTwo)
    {
        CardThree = phandsplitTwo.SendCOneToSplit();
        std::cout << "Card Two: " << CardTwo << std::endl;
    }

private:
    Hand * phand;
    Hand * phandsplit;
};

I want to make it one function instead of needing to add another function that does the exact same thing just with a different object of the same class. Is there a way to do this? if so, can anyone point me in the right direction?

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1  
Are you familiar with the STL containers? or arrays? –  Beta Jan 20 '13 at 5:02
    
a little bit. I am relatively new to programming. I have used them but not to a great extent. –  Chivos Jan 20 '13 at 5:07
    
I've already answered below, but there's something that concerns me about your question: your function takes a reference named phand, and the class has a pointer with the same name, which you're not using. Did you include those member variables in your question on purpose? –  Rick Yorgason Jan 20 '13 at 5:40
    
Nope, I had them there awhile ago when I was messing around and forgot to take them out. –  Chivos Jan 20 '13 at 6:02

3 Answers 3

Just pass an additional parameter to the function which tells you which class member to handle.

enum
{
    CardOne, CardTwo, CardThree, //so on....
}CardNumber;

void getCard(Hand & phandsplitTwo, CardNumber card)   
{
    if(card == CardOne)
       CardOne = phand.SendCOneToSplit();
    else if(card == CardTwo)
       CardTwo = phandsplit.SendCOneToSplit();
    else if(card == CardThree)
       CardThree = phandsplitTwo.SendCOneToSplit();
    //....
}

Note:
I don't know though why you name your method as getXXXXX, they are not actually returning anything. Perhaps, the name should be setXXXXXX??

share|improve this answer
    
what kinda of a parameter would do that though? Could I use a string? –  Chivos Jan 20 '13 at 5:08
    
@user1956980: Updated the answer. –  Alok Save Jan 20 '13 at 5:11

Well, since your variables are public, you could always just pass in the one you want to operate on:

void getCard(Hand& hand, int& card)
{
    card = hand.SendCOneToSplit();
    std::cout << "Card: " << card << std::endl;
}

Then call like this:

split.getCard(hand, split.CardOne);

Of course, using public variables might not be a long-term solution, so another option would be to replace:

int CardOne;
int CardTwo;
int CardThree;

with an array:

int cards[3];

And then just pass in the index you want:

void getCard(Hand& hand, int ndx)
{
    cards[ndx] = hand.SendCOneToSplit();
    std::cout << "Card: " << cards[ndx] << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What happens if the caller passes an index which is out of bounds? Ka-boom! –  Alok Save Jan 20 '13 at 5:23
    
@Alok: Then your input is invalid. When and how to deal with invalid input is a whole different topic. –  Rick Yorgason Jan 20 '13 at 5:36
    
IMO the general guideline is that you should provide an safe interface which does not delegate the entire responsibility of passing proper inputs to the caller. Your code should atleast handle the erroneous inputs. –  Alok Save Jan 20 '13 at 5:40
    
@Alok: That "general guideline" is not followed by classes such as std::string and std::vector; like I said, there's a huge discussion we could have on it. A more hardened solution to this problem would be to mix your answer with my answer, converting the CardNumber into an index, but I can also think of three other valid solutions, and none of them help answer the OP's question. –  Rick Yorgason Jan 20 '13 at 5:51
    
ohhh let me try to explain something a bit better.. The goal is to not use the three card variables. I actually only need one as I am grabbing a card out of a players hand to reset it in a second hand. This is just to grab the variable so it can be sent out of the hand. I ultimately only want to use one variable for the card and grab one card using different objects; however. –  Chivos Jan 20 '13 at 6:06

If performance is of concern, and if there are many "card-types"; I would have use function-pointers(i.e. method pointers).

void (Split::*pfGetTheCard)(Hand & phand);

// Dynamically assign it to one of those:
pfGetTheCard =  &Split::getCardTwo;

// And call it:
(cardobj.*pfGetTheCard)(); 
(pCardPtr->*pfGetTheCard)(); 

Please note that this may not be suitable solution, as it all depends on your design, performance and maintenance issues. This is just my idea!

share|improve this answer
    
performance is not much of an issue, so I will give this a try and see it it works out well. Thank you very much! ;) –  Chivos Jan 20 '13 at 5:22

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