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I have very less experiece with Generics and Reflection. What I assumed so for from the following sample is that it takes too much time to perform. Is there a way so that i accomplish the following without using reflection..

SCENARIO I am working on a method which is generic. it takes an instance of a class passed to it and make SqlParameters from all of the properties. following is the code for generic method called "Store", and one more method that converts c# type to SqlDbType of DbType.

        List<SqlParameter> parameters = new List<SqlParameter>();
        public T Store<T>(T t)
        {
            Type type = t.GetType();
            PropertyInfo[] props = (t.GetType()).GetProperties();
            foreach (PropertyInfo p in props)
            {
                SqlParameter param = new SqlParameter();
                Type propType = p.PropertyType;
                if (propType.BaseType.Name.Equals("ValueType") || propType.BaseType.Name.Equals("Array"))
                {
                    param.SqlDbType = GetDBType(propType); //e.g. public bool enabled{get;set;} OR public byte[] img{get;set;}
                }
                else if (propType.BaseType.Name.Equals("Object"))
                {
                    if (propType.Name.Equals("String"))// for string values
                        param.SqlDbType = GetDBType(propType);
                    else
                    {
                        dynamic d = p.GetValue(t, null); // for referrences e.g. public ClassA obj{get;set;}
                        Store<dynamic>(d);
                    }
                }
                param.ParameterName = p.Name;
                parameters.Add(param);
            }
            return t;
        }



        // mehthod for getting the DbType OR SqlDbType from the type...
        private SqlDbType GetDBType(System.Type type)
        {
            SqlParameter param;
            System.ComponentModel.TypeConverter tc;
            param = new SqlParameter();
            tc = System.ComponentModel.TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(param.DbType);
            if (tc.CanConvertFrom(type))
            {
                param.DbType = (DbType)tc.ConvertFrom(type.Name);
            }
            else
            {
                // try to forcefully convert
                try
                {
                    param.DbType = (DbType)tc.ConvertFrom(type.Name);
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    switch (type.Name)
                    {
                        case "Char":
                            param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Char;
                            break;
                        case "SByte":
                            param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.SmallInt;
                            break;
                        case "UInt16":
                            param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.SmallInt;
                            break;
                        case "UInt32":
                            param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Int;
                            break;
                        case "UInt64":
                            param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Decimal;
                            break;
                        case "Byte[]":
                            param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Binary;
                            break;
                    }
                }
            }
            return param.SqlDbType;
        }

To call my method suppose i have 2 classes as following

public class clsParent
{
    public int pID { get; set; }
    public byte[] pImage { get; set; }
    public string pName { get; set; }
}

and

public class clsChild
{
    public decimal childId { get; set; }
    public string childName { get; set; }
    public clsParent parent { get; set; }
}

and this is a call 


clsParent p = new clsParent();
p.pID = 101;
p.pImage = new byte[1000];
p.pName = "John";
clsChild c = new clsChild();
c.childId = 1;
c.childName = "a";
c.parent = p;

Store<clsChild>(c);
share|improve this question
    
Can you use entity Framework ? –  taher chhabrawala Jan 20 '13 at 8:26
1  
Since you're iterating through an unknown type's properties and getting information about those, I don't think you have any way of avoiding reflection here, and in actuality, your current use of generics doesn't seem to be serving any purpose. You might as well just have the method take an object parameter: public void Store(object t) –  JLRishe Jan 20 '13 at 8:42
    
@JLRishe It is not the full version of what i want to accomplish form the method, but the way the unknown types are handled is clear from this method... I've searched alot for the only problem "Time" but did not find any solution... I want to use ADO.Net with this method –  Abdul Majid Jan 20 '13 at 8:48
    
@taherchhabrawala, thanks for suggestion, but the only issue is that every ORM takes too much time for simple operations... My objective is to Map my Classes to simple ADO.Net –  Abdul Majid Jan 20 '13 at 8:51
1  
@AbdulMajid: Not an alternative, but only a suggestion: If the types are repeatedly stored during runtime you can try to tweak the reflection approach by introducing some caching. You could cache the returned array from the Type.GetProperties(). For the part where you are assigning or converting values, you can try to cache the logic in Func<> instances and reuse them. –  Theo Lenndorff Jan 20 '13 at 10:22
show 2 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to get rid of reflection, you may find inspiration in the code below.

Here all access to objects to store in database as well as the sql property value assignment is handled by a runtime compiled expression build from the data type.

The table holding the values is assumed to be test and the field names are assumed to be identical to the property values.

For each property a Mapping<T> is constructed. It will hold a FieldName containing the database field, a SqlParameter which is supposed to be inserted correctly into a SQL INSERT statement (example in main) and finally if contains the compiled action, that can take an instance of the input T object and assign the value to the SqlParameters property Value. Construction of a collection of these mappings are done in the Mapper<T> class. Code is inlined for explanation.

Finally the main method shows how to bind the stuff together.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace ExpTest
{
    class Program
    {
        public class Mapping<T>
        {
            public Mapping(string fieldname, SqlParameter sqlParameter, Action<T, SqlParameter> assigner)
            {
                FieldName = fieldname;
                SqlParameter = sqlParameter;
                SqlParameterAssignment = assigner;
            }
            public string FieldName { get; private set; }
            public SqlParameter SqlParameter { get; private set; }
            public Action<T, SqlParameter> SqlParameterAssignment { get; private set; }
        }

        public class Mapper<T>
        {
            public IEnumerable<Mapping<T>> GetMappingElements()
            {
                foreach (var reflectionProperty in typeof(T).GetProperties())
                {
                    // Input parameters to the created assignment action
                    var accessor = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "input");
                    var sqlParmAccessor = Expression.Parameter(typeof(SqlParameter), "sqlParm");

                    // Access the property (compiled later, but use reflection to locate property)
                    var property = Expression.Property(accessor, reflectionProperty);

                    // Cast the property to ensure it is assignable to SqlProperty.Value 
                    // Should contain branching for DBNull.Value when property == null
                    var castPropertyToObject = Expression.Convert(property, typeof(object));


                    // The sql parameter
                    var sqlParm = new SqlParameter(reflectionProperty.Name, null);

                    // input parameter for assignment action
                    var sqlValueProp = Expression.Property(sqlParmAccessor, "Value");

                    // Expression assigning the retrieved property from input object 
                    // to the sql parameters 'Value' property
                    var dbnull = Expression.Constant(DBNull.Value);
                    var coalesce = Expression.Coalesce(castPropertyToObject, dbnull);
                    var assign = Expression.Assign(sqlValueProp, coalesce);

                    // Compile into action (removes reflection and makes real CLR object)
                    var assigner = Expression.Lambda<Action<T, SqlParameter>>(assign, accessor, sqlParmAccessor).Compile();

                    yield return
                        new Mapping<T>(reflectionProperty.Name, // Table name
                            sqlParm, // The constructed sql parameter
                            assigner); // The action assigning from the input <T> 

                }
            }
        }

        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var sqlStuff = (new Mapper<Data>().GetMappingElements()).ToList();

            var sqlFieldsList = string.Join(", ", sqlStuff.Select(x => x.FieldName));
            var sqlValuesList = string.Join(", ", sqlStuff.Select(x => '@' + x.SqlParameter.ParameterName));

            var sqlStmt = string.Format("INSERT INTO test ({0}) VALUES ({1})", sqlFieldsList, sqlValuesList);

            var dataObjects = Enumerable.Range(1, 100).Select(id => new Data { Foo = 1.0 / id, ID = id, Title = null });

            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            using (SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection(@"server=.\sqlexpress;database=test;integrated security=SSPI"))
            {
                cnn.Open();

                SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(sqlStmt, cnn);
                cmd.Parameters.AddRange(sqlStuff.Select(x => x.SqlParameter).ToArray());

                dataObjects.ToList()
                    .ForEach(dto =>
                        {
                            sqlStuff.ForEach(x => x.SqlParameterAssignment(dto, x.SqlParameter));
                            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                        });
            }


            Console.WriteLine("Done in: " + sw.Elapsed);
        }
    }

    public class Data
    {
        public string Title { get; set; }
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public double Foo { get; set; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have made this a separate answer since it contains a quite elaborate attempt to use Linqs Expression-namespace to assign values. –  faester Jan 20 '13 at 21:49
    
Although it is not the exact solution i needed, but it helped me to resolve my issue of time... thanks a lot, i will paste my code when i complete it.. –  Abdul Majid Jan 21 '13 at 1:43
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I think you would in general benefit from using a standard ORM like NHibernate or Entity Framework. Both can do (customizable) mappings from classes to relational databases and NHibernate gives you full flexibility between all standard DBMS systems.

Having said that, you should be able to obtain some of the functionality by using Linq expressions, that can later be compiled; this should give you better performance.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont want to use NHibernate or Entity Framework or LINQ to SQL, just because the only issue i have with them is the time taken to perform a simple operation.. My Goal is to Map my Classes with simple ADO.Net –  Abdul Majid Jan 20 '13 at 8:49
    
@AbdulMajid That choice is entirely your decision. I have made an attempt of creating a compiled sqlparameter value assignment methodology and posted as a separate answer. It gets tricky quite fast, but is doable. :) –  faester Jan 20 '13 at 21:51
add comment

Someone told you that reflection is really performance heavy, but you haven't really run your code through a profiler.

I tried your code, and it took 18 ms (65000 ticks) to run, I must say that it is fairly fast compared to the time it will take to save the data in the database. But you are right about that it is really too much time. I found that your code raised one Exception when it called tc.ConvertFrom when converting Byte[]. Removing the byte[] pImage from clsParent the runtime dropped to 850 ticks.

The performance problem here was the Exception, not the reflection.

I have taken the liberty to change your GetDBType to this:

    private SqlDbType GetDBType(System.Type type)
    {
        SqlParameter param;
        System.ComponentModel.TypeConverter tc;
        param = new SqlParameter();
        tc = System.ComponentModel.TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(param.DbType);
        if (tc.CanConvertFrom(type))
        {
            param.DbType = (DbType)tc.ConvertFrom(type.Name);
        }
        else
        {
            switch (type.Name)
            {
                case "Char":
                    param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Char;
                    break;
                case "SByte":
                    param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.SmallInt;
                    break;
                case "UInt16":
                    param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.SmallInt;
                    break;
                case "UInt32":
                    param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Int;
                    break;
                case "UInt64":
                    param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Decimal;
                    break;
                case "Byte[]":
                    param.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Binary;
                    break;

                default:
                    try
                    {
                        param.DbType = (DbType)tc.ConvertFrom(type.Name);
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                        // Some error handling
                    }
                    break;
            }
        }
        return param.SqlDbType;
    }

I hope this will help you in your quest.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the time that is mostly consumed is the following line dynamic d = p.GetValue(t, null); actualy no one told me about the code that it is slow, but i asumed from the time it takes to run.. –  Abdul Majid Jan 20 '13 at 9:51
1  
I really can't tell, I used object d = p.GetValue(t, null), worked like a charm. I don't know anything about the dynamic-keyword performance since I am working in VS 2010. –  Casperah Jan 20 '13 at 10:09
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Not an alternative, but only a suggestion: If the types are repeatedly stored during runtime you can try to tweak the reflection approach by introducing some caching.

Instead of having:

PropertyInfo[] props = (t.GetType()).GetProperties();

try following caching approach:

PropertyInfo[] props = GetProperties(type);

where GetProperties(Type) is a implemented like this:

private Dictionary<Type, PropertyInfo[]> propertyCache;
// ...
public PropertyInfo[] GetProperties(Type t)
{
    if (propertyCache.ContainsKey(t))
    {
        return propertyCache[t];
    }
    else
    {
        var propertyInfos = t.GetProperties();
        propertyCache[t] = propertyInfos;
        return propertyInfos;
    }
}

This is how you can cache the Type.GetProperties() method call. You can apply the same approach which such lookups for some other parts of the code. For instance the place where you use param.DbType = (DbType)tc.ConvertFrom(type.Name);. It is also possible to replace ifs and switchs with lookups. But before you do something like this you should really do some profiling. It complicates code a lot and you should not do that without a good reason.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your time, it helped me a lot... special thanks –  Abdul Majid Jan 20 '13 at 12:35
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