Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
what is the difference between “./somescript.sh” and “. ./somescript.sh”

Please clarify the difference between the shell commands . script.sh vs ./script.sh where script.sh is a shell script.

Thanks

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by NPE, Tomasz Nurkiewicz, H2CO3, Brett Hale, talonmies Jan 20 '13 at 9:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Also stackoverflow.com/questions/1880735/… –  NPE Jan 20 '13 at 8:41
    
1  
you better work on your acceptance rate too. –  Fabian Henze Jan 20 '13 at 8:46

2 Answers 2

The difference is simple

. script.sh

executes the shell script using your current shell, so all changes you do in the script (like change directory or variables) will affect your running shell

./script.sh

on the other hand will start a new shell to execute the script. It is usually the better way to launch scripts

share|improve this answer

To add to the answer given by Fabian above,

You can test it by seeing the output of

echo $$

before and after executing the script.sh in both MODES.You will see difference from their process id

Also, when you use . script.sh all the extern variables defined earlier in the executing shell will still be available

whereas with ./script.sh those extern variables will not be available for the new shell

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.