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I want to have a user defined function in C programming where the function would return the text from the file and filename is passed to the function via parameter to that function. Thanks.

This is because i need to append the text to a variable. How do i modify the following code for this. This is how I tried to do this but i get lots of error now.

example1.c: In function ‘readfile’:
example1.c:47:5: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘fopen’ makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]
/usr/include/stdio.h:273:14: note: expected ‘const char * __restrict__’ but argument is of type ‘int’
example1.c:48:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘exit’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
example1.c:48:52: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘exit’ [enabled by default]
example1.c:56:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘malloc’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
example1.c:56:22: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘malloc’ [enabled by default]
example1.c:57:57: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘exit’ [enabled by default]
example1.c:61:59: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘exit’ [enabled by default]
example1.c:65:2: warning: return makes integer from pointer without a cast [enabled by default]
example1.c:68:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘free’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
example1.c:68:5: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘free’ [enabled by default]
example1.c: At top level:
example1.c:71:30: warning: initialization makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]
example1.c:71:1: error: initializer element is not constant

Please help.

char readfile (fname) {
    FILE * pFile;
    long lSize;
    char * buffer;
    size_t result;

    pFile = fopen ( fname , "rb" );
    if (pFile==NULL) {fputs ("File error",stderr); exit (1);}

    fseek (pFile , 0 , SEEK_END);
    lSize = ftell (pFile);
    rewind (pFile);

    buffer = (char*) malloc (sizeof(char)*lSize);
    if (buffer == NULL) {fputs ("Memory error",stderr); exit (2);}

    result = fread (buffer,1,lSize,pFile);
    if (result != lSize) {fputs ("Reading error",stderr); exit (3);}

    return buffer;
    fclose (pFile);
    free (buffer);
}
AC_ALPHABET_t * input_text = readfile("infile");
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closed as not a real question by Mat, Macmade, Kerrek SB, Oli Charlesworth, Veger Jan 20 '13 at 15:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You'll probably need an editor to accomplish that. And two hands (or at least one hand) –  wildplasser Jan 20 '13 at 12:29
    
You answered your question by yourself. Pass the filename as an argument and return the text. The rest is in 'your' code... –  EarlOfEgo Jan 20 '13 at 12:31
    
@EarlOfEgo The return type of this function is int is it ok if i use char –  rkrara Jan 20 '13 at 12:33
    
There are so many mistakes. I would suggest you first learn the basics. Read some c books, or try cprogramming.com/tutorial/c-tutorial.html –  EarlOfEgo Jan 20 '13 at 12:46
1  
fname has to be a char *, then C has to know what kind of parameters expect each of the library functions you used ; ie add a few #include with the right header files - for that, do, for instance man 3 exit in a linux terminal (or cygwin) or google "C exit manpage" –  ring0 Jan 20 '13 at 12:51
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1 Answer

This really should be easy to do with some research, but I've modified your program so that it has a function that returns a string given a filename. I imagine this isn't the easiest, best, or most correct way to do it, but you asked for a modification of your program.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *read_from_file(const char *filename)
{
    long int size = 0;
    FILE *file = fopen(filename, "r");

    if(!file) {
        fputs("File error.\n", stderr);
        return NULL;
    }

    fseek(file, 0, SEEK_END);
    size = ftell(file);
    rewind(file);

    char *result = (char *) malloc(size);
    if(!result) {
        fputs("Memory error.\n", stderr);
        return NULL;
    }

    if(fread(result, 1, size, file) != size) {
        fputs("Read error.\n", stderr);
        return NULL;
    }

    fclose(file);
    return result;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) 
{
    if(argc < 2) {
        fputs("Need an argument.\n", stderr);
        return -1;
    }

    char *result = read_from_file(argv[1]);

    if(!result) return -1;

    fputs(result, stdout);
    free(result);

    return 0;
}               

Sample run:

[michael@michael-desktop ~]$ echo "hello world" > some_file.txt
[michael@michael-desktop ~]$ ./test some_file.txt
hello world
[michael@michael-desktop ~]$ 

I can comment the program if necessary, but looking up the function references is probably enough.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot, i will try this and let know. –  rkrara Jan 20 '13 at 13:04
    
thanks after some modification to suite my code it work with few warnings like this example1.c: In function ‘read_from_file’: example1.c:88:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘malloc’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration] example1.c:88:29: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘malloc’ [enabled by default] –  rkrara Jan 20 '13 at 13:22
    
@user1733911, did you include the <stdlib.h> header? It's defined there. –  Michael Rawson Jan 20 '13 at 13:41
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