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I have a tSQL query that takes data from one table and copies it into a new table but only rows meeting a certain condition:

SELECT VibeFGEvents.* 
INTO VibeFGEventsAfterStudyStart 
FROM VibeFGEvents
LEFT OUTER JOIN VibeFGEventsStudyStart
ON 
    CHARINDEX(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(logName, 'MyVibe ', ''), ' new laptop', ''), ' old laptop', ''), excelFilename) > 0
    AND VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_TitleInstID <= VibeFGEvents.TitleInstID
    AND VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_WinInstId <= VibeFGEvents.WndInstID
WHERE VibeFGEventsStudyStart.excelFilename IS NOT NULL
ORDER BY VibeFGEvents.id

The code using the table relies on its order, and the copy above does not preserve the order I expected. I.e. the rows in the new table VibeFGEventsAfterStudyStart are not monotonically increasing in the VibeFGEventsAfterStudyStart.id column copied from VibeFGEvents.id.

In tSQL how might I preserve the ordering of the rows from VibeFGEvents in VibeFGEventsStudyStart?

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for simplicity , couldn't you use shorter names , so it will be clearer ? –  Royi Namir Jan 20 '13 at 13:23
    
@RoyiNamir shorter names = less meaningful, so will it be clearer. –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 20 '13 at 13:30
1  
@TonyHopkinson seeking for VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_TitleInstID and seeking if all others are the same name , is painful. –  Royi Namir Jan 20 '13 at 13:31
1  
What does it have to do with Sql server ? I'm talking about asking questions. we dont care about his actual names. we care about his problem. That's why he is here. to ask a question.(clearer = for us , the SO users) –  Royi Namir Jan 20 '13 at 13:39
6  
Since relational databases per se really don't have any concept of order - what's the point of preserving the order upon insert? In general, any relational table is not ordered by default; a result set can be ordered if you explicitly define an ORDER BY clause in your SELECT –  marc_s Jan 20 '13 at 13:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What for?

Point is - data in a table is not ordered. In SQL Server the intrinsic storage order of a table is that of the (if defined) clustered index.

The order in which data is inserted is basically "irrelevant". It is forgotten the moment the data is written into the table.

As such, nothing is gained, even if you get this stuff. If you need an order when dealing with data, you HAVE To put an order by clause on the select that gets it. Anything else is random - i.e. the order you et data is not determined and may change.

So it makes no sense to have a specific order on the insert as you try to achieve.

SQL 101: sets have no order.

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2  
Can you take out "This is a useless request" and I'll mark this as the answer. –  dumbledad Jan 20 '13 at 13:55
    
Ah crap. I got the wrong end of the stick with this one. –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 20 '13 at 13:58
1  
It is a core concept in SQL - pretty much SQL is set based. The order HAS tobe imposed when materialzing a set (in a select). Unless one defines an order in a SELECT; the results are arbitrary and can theoretically change between calls. The order of the data or inserts is lost the moment the data is in the table. THere is no "hidden natural" order. THis is the core of set based operations. –  TomTom Jan 20 '13 at 15:55

I know this is a bit old, but I needed to do something similar. I wanted to insert the contents of one table into another, but in a random order. I found that I could do this by using select top n and order by newid(). Without the 'top n', order was not preserved and the second table had rows in the same order as the first. However, with 'top n', the order (random in my case) was preserved. I used a value of 'n' that was greater than the number of rows. So my query was along the lines of:

insert Table2 (T2Col1, T2Col2)
  select top 10000 T1Col1, T1Col2
  from Table1
  order by newid()
share|improve this answer

I suspect the query engine is optimising the order by when it's doing the inserts. Don't know if this will work, but it will be a quick experiment

Try

SELECT rowstoinsert.* 
INTO VibeFGEventsAfterStudyStart 
FROM 
    (SELECT VibeFGEvents.* 
    FROM VibeFGEvents
    LEFT OUTER JOIN VibeFGEventsStudyStart 
    ON CHARINDEX(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(logName, 'MyVibe ', ''), ' new laptop', ''), ' old laptop', ''), excelFilename) > 0 
    AND VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_TitleInstID <= VibeFGEvents.TitleInstID 
    AND VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_WinInstId <= VibeFGEvents.WndInstID 
    WHERE VibeFGEventsStudyStart.excelFilename IS NOT NULL 
    ORDER BY VibeFGEvents.id) rowstoinsert

Based on further info

SELECT rowstoinsert.* 
INTO VibeFGEventsAfterStudyStart 
FROM 
    (SELECT VibeFGEvents.* 
    FROM VibeFGEvents
    LEFT OUTER JOIN VibeFGEventsStudyStart 
    ON CHARINDEX(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(logName, 'MyVibe ', ''), ' new laptop', ''), ' old laptop', ''), excelFilename) > 0 
    AND VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_TitleInstID <= VibeFGEvents.TitleInstID 
    AND VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_WinInstId <= VibeFGEvents.WndInstID 
    WHERE VibeFGEventsStudyStart.excelFilename IS NOT NULL) rowstoinsert 
    ORDER BY rowstoinsert.id

Have to be my last guess though and I don't have a sql server available at the moment.

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This throws an error for me: The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived tables, subqueries, and common table expressions, unless TOP, OFFSET or FOR XML is also specified. (N.B. the -1 isn't me.) –  dumbledad Jan 20 '13 at 13:48
    
Now thats interesting. Another wee change –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 20 '13 at 13:50
    
Did you just mark me down? –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 20 '13 at 13:54
1  
No, you are being helpful! –  dumbledad Jan 20 '13 at 13:58
1  
No, he was not. I downvoted because he was helping in the (wrong) assumption that the order wold have any sense once it is inserted. SQL tables have no strong order, and any select you do on ANY table is ALWAYS "arbitrary order" (which can change between calls) UNLESS you do an order in the SELECT. As such, the order in which one does an insert is useless, so this answer is - useless. SQL beginner concepts: a table is a set of data without defined order, if you want an order, you HAVE to specify it on the select querying the data. –  TomTom Jan 20 '13 at 15:54

Try using INSERT INTO instead of SELECT INTO

INSERT INTO VibeFGEventsAfterStudyStart 
SELECT VibeFGEvents.* 
FROM VibeFGEvents
LEFT OUTER JOIN VibeFGEventsStudyStart
ON 
    CHARINDEX(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(logName, 'MyVibe ', ''), ' new laptop', ''), ' old laptop', ''), excelFilename) > 0
    AND VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_TitleInstID <= VibeFGEvents.TitleInstID
    AND VibeFGEventsStudyStart.MIN_WinInstId <= VibeFGEvents.WndInstID
WHERE VibeFGEventsStudyStart.excelFilename IS NOT NULL
ORDER BY VibeFGEvents.id`
share|improve this answer
    
A table has no order. See the other comments in this question. –  usr Jan 20 '13 at 14:05
    
I do understand table has no order in this scenario. The point is rows can be inserted using INSERT INTO with a sub query that can be ordered. –  Geo2013 Jan 20 '13 at 14:38
    
A simple observation: In this case, the ORDER BY clause is for SELECT VibeFGEvents.* FROM ... statement and not for INSERT statement. –  Bogdan Sahlean Jan 20 '13 at 14:58
1  
It does not matter what order you insert in. When selecting, that order is gone. You cannot get it "out" again. –  usr Jan 20 '13 at 15:13

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