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I am looking to make a simple code in R to generate a matrix like the one below..

I know you start one like:

 for(i in 1:10){

But I am not sure where to go from here. I know I can just use outer(1:10,1:10) but am looking to use a for() do() statement.

    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10
 1  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  
 2  2   4   6   8   10  12  14  16  18  20  
 3  3   6   9   12  15  18  21  24  27  30  
 4  4   8   12  16  20  24  28  32  36  40  
 5  5   10  15  20  25  30  35  40  45  50  
 6  6   12  18  24  30  36  42  48  54  60  
 7  7   14  21  28  35  42  49  56  63  70  
 8  8   16  24  32  40  48  56  64  72  80  
 9  9   18  27  36  45  54  63  72  81  90 
 10 10  20  30  40  50  60  70  80  90 100  
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Why exactly are you trying to do this with for? –  Stephan Kolassa Jan 20 '13 at 13:23
    
Is there another easy way to do it? I have no idea.. –  user1977802 Jan 20 '13 at 13:27
    
In general, for loops are quite inefficient in R; it is often better to do everything using vector logic. You already know how to do this with outer. So I assume that you have a more complex problem than this one, one you cannot solve with outer. I just wonder whether a for loop will be the best way to do it. –  Stephan Kolassa Jan 20 '13 at 13:30
3  
@StephanKolassa Honestly, for loops aren't so bad if you don't grow an object. They do get pretty awful for large numbers of iterations due to the function call overhead, but otherwise don't deserve the stigma they've attracted. –  sebastian-c Jan 20 '13 at 13:31
    
@sebastian-c: you can reduce the function call overhead by putting the loop in a function and compiling it. Also, in addition to growing objects, using data.frames in a loop is slow, but that's because data.frames are slow. –  Joshua Ulrich Jan 20 '13 at 14:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

for me to explain outer, you need 2 loops ( at least how I would do if I want to implement it)

v <- c()
for(i in 1:10)
  for(j in 1:10)
    v <- c(v,i*j)      ## This is SLOW! (naughty)
matrix(v,ncol=10,nrow=10)

EDIT

In my last implementation I allocate dynamically the size of the matrix which is very slow. It is better to allocate the matrix before the loops, something like this:

xx <- matrix(NA,ncol=10,nrow=10)
for(i in 1:10)
  for(j in 1:10)
    xx[i,j] <- i*j 

Another way to do with vectors:

I <- 1:10
J <- 1:10
I %*% t(J)
share|improve this answer
    
You should know better than to grow an object inside a loop... naughty. –  Joshua Ulrich Jan 20 '13 at 13:55
    
@JoshuaUlrich tyanks !I update my answer. My purpose was to show that outer is mathematically based in 2 indexs. –  agstudy Jan 20 '13 at 14:03

Disclaimer: This is a kinda silly thing to do as outer is a way better option. For fun and educational purposes:

#Define dimensions
matx <- 10
maty <- 10
mat <- matrix(NA, matx, maty)

#For loop
for(i in seq_len(maty)){
  mat[,i] <- i * seq_len(matx)
}

Note that I've defined the size of the matrix before looping. This will prevent the horrors of growing an object as described in the R Inferno.

share|improve this answer

Another suggestion:

lines = 10
output= seq(from=1,by=1,length.out=columns)
i=2
while (i<lines+1){
  temp2 = seq(from=i, by=i, length.out=lines)
  output= cbind(output, temp2)
  i = i+1
}
share|improve this answer
1  
using cbind inside a loops is naugthy also... –  agstudy Jan 20 '13 at 14:03

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