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The linker reports duplicate symbol on this:

#ifndef testttt
#define testttt

void anything(){
    std::cout<<"hellooooooo";
}

#endif

Because it is inside the include guards, I would expect that this function is only defined once. But apparently not.

I know I can put the word static in front of it and then it will work (which I still find ironic, since static is supposed to give it internal linkage, yet the function can be used from multiple cpp files).

So I guess my two-part question is: 1) Why do the include guards not prevent multiple definitions of this function like they do for other header items, and 2) Why does the static word resolve this when static is supposed to prevent names from visibility in other translation units? I add it, and I can actually call this function from anywhere that includes this header file.

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marked as duplicate by lpapp, Lestat, mkaes, typ1232, nKn Feb 17 at 10:48

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3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

"1) Why do the include guards not prevent multiple definitions of this function like they do for other header items"

Because each translation unit (i.e. .cpp file) is processed separately and goes through the same conditional. Translation units won't share the preprocessor definitions encountered by other translation units. This means that all the translation units that will process that header will include a definition for that function. Of course, the linker will then complain that the same function has multiple definitions.

"2) Why does the static word resolve this when static is supposed to prevent names from visibility in other translation units?"

Because the static keyword makes a private copy of that function for each translation unit.

If you want that function to be defined in a shared header, however, you should rather mark it as inline, which will solve your problem and will make the preprocessor guards unnecessary.

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Why do the include guards not prevent multiple definitions of this function like they do for other header items?

The process of creating an executable from a C++ program consists of three stages:

  1. Preprocessing
  2. Compilation &
  3. Linking

Preprocessing: the preprocessor directives like macros etc are replaced during this stage.
Compilation is converting the source code in to object code by checking for language semantics.
Linking is to link all the generated object code together to form an executable.

Header guards prevent the contents of the header to be included multiple times in the same translation unit during preprocessing. They do not prevent the contents to be included in different translation units. When you include this header file in different translation units, each of these units will have a definition of this function.
The compiler compiles each translation unit separately to produce a separate object file(.o), each of those .o files will have an copy of this function definition. When the linker tries to link to the function definition at time of generating the .exe it finds multiple definitions of the same functions, thereby causing confusion as to which one to link to. To avoid this problem the standard defines a rule known as the One defintion rule(ODR), which forbids multiple definitions of the same entity.
As you see including the function definition in the header file and including that header file in multiple translation units violates the ODR.
The usual way to do this is to provide the declaration in the header file and the definition in one and only one source file.

Why does the static word resolve this when static is supposed to prevent names from visibility in other translation units?

When you add the keyword static to the function each translation unit will have its own copy of the function. By default functions have external linkage but static forces the function to have an internal linkage. Thus the definition is not visible to different translation units. Each instance of such a function is treated as a separate function(address of each function is different) and each instance of these functions have their own copies of static local variables & string literals. Note that this increases the size of your executable considerably.


If you want to include the function definition in a header file. There are 3 ways to do it:

  1. Mark the function as inline or
  2. Mark the function as static or
  3. Put the function in an unnamed namespace.

Note that #1 and #2 do the same as mentioned in second answer above.
With #3 the standard relaxes the ODR for inline functions and allows each translation unit to have its own definition(provided all definitions are same).

So if you really want to put a function definition in header #1 is the right way to do it.

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Thanks, makes sense. But why does the include guard not allow this to be a "global function" without multiple declarations? –  OpenLearner Jan 20 '13 at 14:07
    
@SebbyJohanns: Updated with detail.Hth. –  Alok Save Jan 20 '13 at 14:19

1) Why do the include guards not prevent multiple definitions of this function like they do for other header items,

Include guards prevent from multiple inclusion of the header in the same translation unit. It does not, however, prevent from multiple definitions : if the header is included in multiple translation unit, then there will be multiple definition error, because the function is defined in each translation unit, and since it has external linkage, all translation unit can see the definition from all other translation units. To prevent this error, you only have to provide the declaration in the header, and provide the definition in ONE .cpp file.

Read about One Definition Rule (ODR) and External Linkage.

2) Why does the static word resolve this when static is supposed to prevent names from visibility in other translation units?

Because static makes the function internal to each translation unit.That is what internal linkage means: other translation unit cannot see the definition.

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