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I am reading this document to learn Perl's taint mode => http://www.webreference.com/programming/perl/taint/index.html

It is mentioned one way of clean tainted value,

Another more obscure way to clean tainted values is to use them as a hash key; since hash keys themselves are never considered tainted

I do not quite understand what means "use them as a hash key", and why hash key as never treated as tainted. Appreciate if anyone could help?

thanks in advance, Lin

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Do you know what a hash is? –  melpomene Jan 20 '13 at 14:57
4  
You should probably consider that more as a warning than as advice about how to clean tainted values. –  Keith Thompson Jan 20 '13 at 15:14
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You should really pay no attention to that statement. What it means is that, if you run this in taint mode

my $fname = <>;
chomp $fname;
open my $fh, '>', $fname;

then the program will die because you are using a tainted value for the file name. But if you store that value as a hash key, like this

my $fname = <>;
chomp $fname;
my %data;
$data{$fname} = 1;
open my $fh, '>', $_ for keys %data;

then the code will run fine.

The reason for this is nothing to do with wisdom about tainted values, but rather that the keys of a hash aren't scalar values, but just simple strings that are stored within the internal Perl hash structure. Perl scalar values - like scalar variables or hash or array values - are much more complicated data structures that contain information about the status and nature of the value as well as its actual contents, and only these can be flagged as being tainted. In contrast a hash key is just a string of characters, and it cannot carry any status information.

So, as I said, apart from being aware of this shortcoming of Perl, you should ignore this statement in the documentation.

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Why ignore that statement? That's a completely stupid thing to say. Everyone should realize that taint checking is a developer tool that isn't a safety net. There are many things it can't or won't do for you. –  brian d foy Jan 21 '13 at 15:45
    
@briandfoy Because that statement sounds like a recommendation? And it is an awful recommendation that everyone should ignore? When you read it in context it doesn't sound quite as bad, but here on stackoverflow.com it stands alone, and the link provided may not always be there to provide context for those few willing to click a link to learn more. –  TLP Jan 21 '13 at 16:07
    
Hi Borodin, thanks for the detailed reply. My confusion is, if the input string is used as key for hash table, the hacker could input arbitrary keys to get arbitrary mapped hash value. For example, if we are using a hash table to store user ID to password mapping relationship. In legal case, he should only input his ID to get his password, but if he inputs admin's user ID, he could get admin's password. So, I think even if using external input value for hash keys, it is not safe and should be treated as tainted value? Any comments? –  Lin Ma Jan 21 '13 at 17:39
    
@briandfoy: "Another ... way to clean tainted values" is a dreadful choice of phrase. It should rather be something like "Unfortunately Perl is unable to maintain taint checking on hash keys, and care must be taken in this regard". –  Borodin Jan 22 '13 at 1:52
2  
@LinMa: You are quite right. And Perl doesn't untaint hash keys because it's a Good Idea, it does it because there is no feasible way to do anything else. That means you must be especially careful if you are using tainted data as a hash key, and bear in mind that Perl's taint checking won't warn you in that case. –  Borodin Jan 22 '13 at 2:02
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It seems to be a fishy way to circumvent tainting checks. This is a very silly thing to do. Tainting checks are there to make sure you are not doing anything unsafe in your script. In this case, using data from an unsafe source without first validating it.

Here is an example. The -T switch in the shebang here is what turns tainting checks on.

#!/usr/bin/perl -T
use strict;
use warnings;

chomp(my $foo = <>);
#my %a; $a{$foo} = 1;
#($foo) = keys %a;
open my $fh, ">", $foo or die "cant open $foo: $!";

This code will die and produce the error:

Insecure dependency in open while running with -T switch at foo.pl line 11, <> line 1.

If the commented lines are uncommented, it will run normally with whatever arbitrary text we put in there, without any untainting.

As mentioned, it is a bad idea because it circumvents a security measure.

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1  
or $foo = each %{{ $foo => 1 }}; –  ysth Jan 20 '13 at 18:21
1  
@ysth Yes, it is possible to make the code shorter and skip transition variables, but perhaps it does not make the example clearer in this case. –  TLP Jan 21 '13 at 6:16
    
It's not that it's silly. It's something you have to watch out for in case you accidentally do it. –  brian d foy Jan 21 '13 at 15:44
    
@briandfoy Are you serious? Are you downvoting my answer because in your opinion the quote looked like a warning, and not a recommendation? Is there anything "not useful" about my answer? –  TLP Jan 21 '13 at 15:50
    
I'm downvoting you because you propagate the lie that "Tainting checks are there to make sure you are not doing anything unsafe in your script". The only thing taint checking does is stop your program if you try to pass untainted external data to an external process. Additionally, untainting data does not make it safe. –  brian d foy Jan 22 '13 at 19:18
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Hash keys aren't full scalar structures that have the behind-the-scenes magic that tracks things such as taint. A hash key is raw string. Using a value as a hash key loses all the bookkeeping that Perl does with scalars. I talk about this quite a bit in the "Secure Programming Techniques" chapter in Mastering Perl.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Brian, thanks for the detailed reply. My confusion is, if the input string is used as key for hash table, the hacker could input arbitrary keys to get arbitrary mapped hash value. For example, if we are using a hash table to store user ID to password mapping relationship. In legal case, he should only input his ID to get his password, but if he inputs admin's user ID, he could get admin's password. So, I think even if using external input value for hash keys, it is not safe and should be treated as tainted value? Any comments? –  Lin Ma Jan 21 '13 at 17:37
1  
For the reasons I said, taint doesn't handle that. –  brian d foy Jan 22 '13 at 15:11
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