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I am using the twitter bootstrap framework, so to get the EditorFor and DisplayFor methods to output what I need, I created custom templates for each of the types like string, text, password etc. For my login page I want a RememberMe bool, so as before, I created the following template and put in in Boolean.cshtml:

@model bool

<div class="control-group">
    <div class="controls">
        <label class="checkbox">
            @Html.CheckBoxFor(m => m, new {@class = "checkbox"})
            @Html.LabelFor(m => m)
        </label>
    </div>
</div>

Pretty simple, but when I use:

@Html.EditorFor(m => m.RememberMe)

I get an exception saying the value being bassed cannot be null:

The model item passed into the dictionary is null, but this dictionary requires a non-null model item of type 'System.Boolean'.

What am I missing? Seems like it should be straight forward. The field on the model object looks like follows:

[Display(Name = "Remember me?")]
public bool RememberMe { get; set; }

Thanks.

UPDATE: So it seems that in the end it's a matter of creating an empty view model object and passing it to the view instead of letting MVC create one on it's own.

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Could you try to set the RememberMe default value with dataannotations [DefaultValue(false)] –  AliRıza Adıyahşi Jan 20 '13 at 15:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I would not do it that way. If the value can be null, I would make sure that your editor template has nullable boolean as the model type. So your editor template (in Views\Shared\EditorTemplates\Boolean.cshtml) would be:

@model Boolean?

@Html.CheckBox("", Model.HasValue && Model.Value)

And then in the razor of your main view, you could have:

<div class="control-group">
    <div class="controls">
        <label class="checkbox">
            @Html.EditorFor(m => m, new {@class = "checkbox"})
            @Html.LabelFor(m => m)
        </label>
    </div>
</div>
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I like this approach. The boolean could not normally be null (not in the model object I was using in any case), but I think this approach would allow it to work with the standard MVC way of calling the view as is rather than creating a new empty model object. NOTE: I actually think this is an actual answer to my original question, my answer was a workaround. –  Tyrel Van Niekerk Mar 10 '13 at 19:09

You have to initialize your RememberMe bool value inside the constructor as shown below.

Remember that using uninitialized variables in C# is not allowed.

using System.ComponentModel; 

public class ClassName
 {    
   public ClassName ()
        {
            RememberMe = false;
        }

   [DefaultValue(false)]
   [Display(Name = "Remember me?")]
   public bool RememberMe { get; set; }
 }

For more infromation check Default Values Table

I hope this will help to you.

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3  
Only reference types has null as the default value. Bool is a value type and the default value of the bool is false.. OP has a simple bool property a not nullable bool (e.g bool?). –  nemesv Jan 20 '13 at 16:58
    
@nemesv Thanks for the correction.I have updated my post. –  Sampath Jan 20 '13 at 17:06
    
My impression was that bool will have a default value of false. Anyways, I tried both setting to false in constructor and the DefaultValue property with the same results as before. I wonder if I just have something else wrong with the template. When I have it directly in the code with @Html.ComboBoxFor, that works fine, so the bool is set. –  Tyrel Van Niekerk Jan 21 '13 at 4:03
    
@TyrelVanNiekerk could you put whole class related to the "@model bool" model ? –  Sampath Jan 21 '13 at 7:06
    
public class LoginModel { [Required] [Display(Name = "User name")] public string Username { get; set; } [Required] [DataType(DataType.Password)] [Display(Name = "Password")] public string Password { get; set; } [Display(Name = "Remember me?")] public bool RememberMe { get; set; } } –  Tyrel Van Niekerk Jan 21 '13 at 15:33

Reading the responses so far, I started wondering about how the model object was being initialized. So this is rather weird, but I found the answer. Hopefully someone can explain the weirdness. Might be how MVC initializes a model object if you don't specify one.

The default MVC Internet template has the following for the Login action:

[AllowAnonymous]
public ActionResult Login(string returnUrl)
{
    ViewBag.ReturnUrl = returnUrl;

    return View();
}

That gives the error. Changing it to the following however, fixes the problem:

[AllowAnonymous]
public ActionResult Login(string returnUrl)
{
    var loginModel = new LoginModel();

    ViewBag.ReturnUrl = returnUrl;

    return View(loginModel);
}

So this answers the question on how to solve the problem, but still leaves the reason unresolved. Could it be because MVC creates an instance of the object in a different way, say with reflection or something?

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Looks like in the first example you are NOT setting a view model - but your View is expecting one...and therefore the properties (and the model) are all null. Check the error carefully as I'd expect the null to be on the model and not the property iteself. Second example you are explicitly instantiating the view model, so the world is a good place. –  BlueChippy Jan 21 '13 at 4:16
    
Yea, that seems to be what's going on. That first bit is the default MVC template code and it works normally. I assume that MVC creates the view model somewhere along the way, but not soon enough for the custom template. –  Tyrel Van Niekerk Jan 21 '13 at 14:32
    
The difference is that MVC3 EditorFor<> is an extension method in public static class EditorExtensions returning MvcHtmlString. This means on a null value it can handle it and return the empty checkbox. My suggestion: a) keep with what you have...you can even add returnUrl to the model if you like. b) in the view, add a @code block and set a local bool for the checkbox. c) add an editorfor as your own extension method returning mvchtmlstring. Finally: What is your reason for overriding the EditorFor<bool> with your own editor template? Can it be done with css instead? –  BlueChippy Jan 22 '13 at 5:54

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