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Consider the below code snippet:

  class BaseClass
{
    public void SayHi()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hi from base class");
    }

    public virtual void SayHello()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello from base class");
    }
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public void SayHi()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hi from derived class");
    }

    public new void SayHello()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello from derived class");
    }
}

 class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BaseClass _object = new DerivedClass();

        _object.SayHi();
        _object.SayHello();

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

The output for above shows:

Hi from base class 
Hi from derived class

Can anyone please explain me the reason behind this. Also, is it not necessary to override a virtual method of base class if we are creating a method of same name in derived class?

share|improve this question
    
Your output is wrong. This should say Hi from base class and Hello from base class. – Khan Jan 20 '13 at 15:29

The whole point of polymorphism is that an object of type BaseClass can be set to an instance of a Derived class but have different behavior [semantics]. If this wasn't the case then you'd never be able to insert a new derived Form instance into the Winforms framework.

OP, your definition is wrong. Virtual methods are to enable Polymorphism. The use of the new keyword is wrong too, it should be override to define new behavior for a virtual method.

Your virtual methods in your base class can be overridden in your base classes so that even if your variable type is BaseClass, your overridden virtual methods will be invoked on that variable.

share|improve this answer
    
You are viewing desire of OP? He wants to declare as new. Have you have something against it? – Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 20 '13 at 16:32
    
@Hamlet; nothing against it at all. I see i may have not answered the OPs exact question.... thanks for pointing that out! This isn't the first or last time i'll make a mistake on SO... :/ ;) – Quinton Bernhardt Jan 20 '13 at 16:37

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