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I'm trying to represent a simplified chromosome, which consists of N bases, each of which can only be one of {A, C, T, G}. I'd like to formalize the constraints with an enum, but I'm wondering what the most idiomatic way of emulating an enum is in go / golang.

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1  
In go standard packages they're represented as constants. See golang.org/pkg/os/#pkg-constants –  dystroy Jan 20 '13 at 16:11
2  
related: stackoverflow.com/questions/14236263/… –  lbonn Jan 20 '13 at 16:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 116 down vote accepted

Quoting from the language specs:Iota

Within a constant declaration, the predeclared identifier iota represents successive untyped integer constants. It is reset to 0 whenever the reserved word const appears in the source and increments after each ConstSpec. It can be used to construct a set of related constants:

const (  // iota is reset to 0
        c0 = iota  // c0 == 0
        c1 = iota  // c1 == 1
        c2 = iota  // c2 == 2
)

const (
        a = 1 << iota  // a == 1 (iota has been reset)
        b = 1 << iota  // b == 2
        c = 1 << iota  // c == 4
)

const (
        u         = iota * 42  // u == 0     (untyped integer constant)
        v float64 = iota * 42  // v == 42.0  (float64 constant)
        w         = iota * 42  // w == 84    (untyped integer constant)
)

const x = iota  // x == 0 (iota has been reset)
const y = iota  // y == 0 (iota has been reset)

Within an ExpressionList, the value of each iota is the same because it is only incremented after each ConstSpec:

const (
        bit0, mask0 = 1 << iota, 1<<iota - 1  // bit0 == 1, mask0 == 0
        bit1, mask1                           // bit1 == 2, mask1 == 1
        _, _                                  // skips iota == 2
        bit3, mask3                           // bit3 == 8, mask3 == 7
)

This last example exploits the implicit repetition of the last non-empty expression list.


So your code might be like

const (
        A = iota
        C
        T
        G
)

or

type Base int

const (
        A Base = iota
        C
        T
        G
)

if you want bases to be a separate type from int.

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5  
great examples (I did not recall the exact iota behaviour - when it is incremented - from the spec). Personally I like to give a type to an enum, so it can be type-checked when used as argument, field, etc. –  PuerkitoBio Jan 20 '13 at 16:46
5  
Very interesting @jnml . But I'm kind of disappointed that static type-checking seems to be loose, for example nothing prevents me from using Base n°42 which never existed : play.golang.org/p/oH7eiXBxhR –  Ripounet Jan 20 '13 at 17:31
2  
Go has no concept of numeric subrange types, like e.g. Pascal's has, so Ord(Base) is not limited to 0..3 but has the same limits as its underlying numeric type. It's a language design choice, compromise between safety and performance. Consider "safe" run time bound checks every time when touching a Base typed value. Or how should one define 'overflow' behavior of Base value for arithmetics and for ++ and --? Etc. –  zzzz Jan 20 '13 at 17:41
2  
To complement on jnml, even semantically, nothing in the language says that the consts defined as Base represent the whole range of valid Base, it just says that these particular consts are of type Base. More constants could be defined elsewhere as Base too, and it is not even mutually exclusive (e.g. const Z Base = 0 could be defined and would be valid). –  PuerkitoBio Jan 21 '13 at 1:56
    
@PuerkitoBio iota is incremented at every new line. So if you initialize two constants on the same line to iota, they will have the same value. If you skip a line (a la the example above) using _, the next assignment will be the value before the skip plus two. –  weberc2 Jan 23 '13 at 15:51

Refering to the answer of jnml, you could prevent new instances of Base type by not exporting the Base type at all (i.e. write it lowercase). If needed, you may make an exportable interface that has a method that returns a base type, so that this interface could be used in functions from the outside that deal with Bases, i.e.

package a

type base int

const (
    A base = iota
    C
    T
    G
)


type Baser interface {
    Base() base
}

// every base must fullfill the Baser interface
func(b base) Base() base {
    return b
}


func(b base) OtherMethod()  {
}

package main

import "a"

// func from the outside that handles a.base via a.Baser
// since a.base is not exported, only exported bases that are created within package a may be used, like a.A, a.C, a.T. and a.G
func HandleBasers(b a.Baser) {
    base := b.Base()
    base.OtherMethod()
}


// func from the outside that returns a.A or a.C, depending of condition
func AorC(condition bool) a.Baser {
    if condition {
       return a.A
    }
    return a.C
}

Inside the main package a.Baser is effectively like an enum now. Only inside the a package you may defined new instances.

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3  
Your method seems perfect for the cases where base is used only as method receiver. If your a package were to expose a function taking a parameter of type base, then it would become dangerous. Indeed, the user could just call it with the literal value 42, which the function would accept as base since it can be casted to an int. To prevent this, make base a struct: type base struct{value:int}. Problem: you cannot declare bases as constants anymore, only module variables. But 42 will never be cast to a base of that type. –  Niriel Sep 29 '13 at 15:21

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