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A complete binary tree is defined as a binary tree in which every level, except possibly the deepest, is completely filled. At deepest level, all nodes must be as far left as possible.

I'd think a simple recursive algorithm will be able to tell whether a given binary tree is complete, but I can't seem to figure it out.

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please refer to the stackoverflow.com/questions/18159884/… for one of the easiest approach. –  Trying Aug 10 '13 at 11:09

12 Answers 12

Similar to:

height(t) = if (t==NULL) then 0 else 1+max(height(t.left),height(t.right))

You have:

perfect(t) = if (t==NULL) then 0 else { 
                  let h=perfect(t.left)
                  if (h != -1 && h==perfect(t.right)) then 1+h else -1
             }

Where perfect(t) returns -1 if the leaves aren't all at the same depth, or any node has only one child; otherwise, it returns the height.

Edit: this is for "complete" = "A perfect binary tree is a full binary tree in which all leaves are at the same depth or same level.[1] (This is ambiguously also called a complete binary tree.)" (Wikipedia).

Here's a recursive check for: "A complete binary tree is a binary tree in which every level, except possibly the last, is completely filled, and all nodes are as far left as possible.". It returns (-1,false) if the tree isn't complete, otherwise (height,full) if it is, with full==true iff it's perfect.

complete(t) = if (t==NULL) then (0,true) else { 
                  let (hl,fl)=complete(t.left)
                  let (hr,fr)=complete(t.right)                      
                  if (fl && hl==hr) then (1+h,fr)
                  else if (fr && hl==hr+1) then (1+h,false)
                  else (-1,false)
              }
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this will not work for a tree like this (a(b(d)(e))(c)) note:(root(left)(right)) –  Akshay Sep 18 '09 at 5:48
    
check can be changed to allow a height difference of 1, but that will give incorrect result for (a(b(d(h)(i))(e))(c(f(j)(k))(g))). –  Akshay Sep 18 '09 at 5:51
    
I see. The terminology confused me. "complete" doesn't really mean complete. –  Jonathan Graehl Sep 18 '09 at 6:28
    
Fixed for the "partially full left-filled last level" version of complete. –  Jonathan Graehl Sep 18 '09 at 6:43
//Author : Sagar T.U, PESIT
//Helper function

int depth (struct tree * n)
{
   int ld,rd;

   if (n == NULL) return 0;

   ld=depth(n->left);
   ld=depth(n->right);

   if (ld>rd)
      return (1+ld);
   else
      return (1+rd);

}


//Core function

int isComplete (struct tree * n)
{
   int ld,rd;

   if (n == NULL) return TRUE;

   ld=depth(n->left);
   rd=depth(n->right);

   return(ld==rd && isComplete(n->left) && isComplete(n->right));

}
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This is not the definition of complete binary tree that @Akshay asked. You are implementing the "perfect tree" –  DpGeek Nov 20 '13 at 5:49

The simplest procedure is:

  1. Find depth of the tree (simple algorithm).
  2. Count the number of nodes in a tree (by traversing and increasing the counter by one on visiting any node).
  3. For a complete binary tree of level d number of nodes equals to pow(2,d+1)-1.

If condition satisfy tree, is complete binary tree, else not.

That's a simple algorithm and turning it into a working code shouldn't be a problem if you are good enough coder.

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1  
but this will not work if the last level is not completely full. –  Trying Aug 28 '13 at 21:55

You could combine three pieces of information from the subtrees:

  • Whether the subtree is complete

  • The maximal height

  • The minimal height (equal to maximal height or to maximal height - 1)

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You can do it recursively by comparing the heights of each node's children. There may be at most one node where the left child has a height exactly one greater than the right child; all other nodes must be perfectly balanced.

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Height being defined as distance from the nearest leaf node? Furthest leaf node? –  Null Set May 6 '11 at 19:11
    
@Null Set: the height is the distance from the current node to the deepest leaf among its descendants. –  Svante May 9 '11 at 11:44

There may be one possible algorithm which I feel would solve this problem. Consider the tree:

Level 0:    a  
Level 1:  b   c  
Level 2: d e f g  
  • We employ breadth first traversal.

  • For each enqueued element in the queue we have to make three checks in order:

    1. If there is a single child or no child terminate; else, check 2.
    2. If there exist both children set a global flag = true.
      1. Set flags for each node in the queue as true: flag[b] = flag[c] = true.
      2. Check for each entry if they have left n right child n then set the flags or reset them to false.
      3. (Dequeue) if(queue_empty())
        compare all node flags[]... if all true global_flag = true else global_flag = false.
      4. If global_flag = true go for proceed with next level in breadth first traversal else terminate

Advantage: entire tree may not be traversed
Overhead: maintaining flag entries

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The following code simply treats every possible cases. Tree height is obtained along the way to avoid another recursion.

enum CompleteType
{
    kNotComplete = 0,
    kComplete = 1, // Complete but not full
    kFull = 2,
    kEmpty = 3
};

CompleteType isTreeComplete(Node* node, int* height)
{
    if (node == NULL)
    {
        *height = 0;
        return kEmpty;
    }

    int leftHeight, rightHeight;

    CompleteType leftCompleteType = isTreeComplete(node->left, &leftHeight);
    CompleteType rightCompleteType = isTreeComplete(node->right, &rightHeight);

    *height = max(leftHeight, rightHeight) + 1;

    // Straight forwardly treat all possible cases
    if (leftCompleteType == kComplete && 
        rightCompleteType == kEmpty &&
        leftHeight == rightHeight + 1)
        return kComplete;

    if (leftCompleteType == Full)
    {
        if (rightCompleteType == kEmpty && leftHeight == rightHeight + 1)
            return kComplete;
        if (leftHeight == rightHeight)
        {
            if (rightCompleteType == kComplete)
                return kComplete;
            if (rightCompleteType == kFull)
                return kFull;
        }
    }

    if (leftCompleteType == kEmpty && rightCompleteType == kEmpty)
        return kFull;

    return kNotComplete;
}

bool isTreeComplete(Node* node)
{
    int height;
    return (isTreeComplete(node, &height) != kNotComplete);
}
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You can also solve this problem by using level order traversal. The procedure is as follows:

  1. Store the data element of the nodes encountered in a vector
  2. If the node is NULL, then store a special number(INT_MIN)
  3. Keep track of the last non-null node visited - lastentry
  4. Now traverse the vector till lastentry. If you ever encounter INT_MIN, then the tree is not complete. Else it is a complete binary tree.

Here is a c++ code:

My tree node is:

struct node{
    int data;
    node *left, *right;
};

void checkcomplete(){//checks whether a tree is complete or not by performing level order traversal
    node *curr = root;
    queue<node *> Q;
    vector<int> arr;
    int lastentry = 0;
    Q.push(curr);
    int currlevel = 1, nextlevel = 0;
    while( currlevel){
        node *temp = Q.front();
        Q.pop();
        currlevel--;
        if(temp){
            arr.push_back(temp->data);
            lastentry = arr.size();
            Q.push(temp->left);
            Q.push(temp->right);
            nextlevel += 2;
        }else
            arr.push_back(INT_MIN);
        if(!currlevel){
            currlevel = nextlevel;
            nextlevel = 0;
        }
    }
    int flag = 0;
    for( int i = 0; i<lastentry && !flag; i++){
        if( arr[i] == INT_MIN){
            cout<<"Not a complete binary tree"<<endl;
            flag = 1;
        }
    }
    if( !flag )
        cout<<"Complete binary tree\n";
}
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private static boolean isCompleteBinaryTree(TreeNode root) {

if (root == null) {
    return false;
} else {
    boolean completeFlag = false;
    List<TreeNode> list = new ArrayList<TreeNode>();
    list.add(root);
    while (!list.isEmpty()) {
        TreeNode element = list.remove(0);
        if (element.left != null) {
            if (completeFlag) {
                return false;
            }
        list.add(element.left);
        } else {
            completeFlag = true;
        }
        if (element.right != null) {
            if (completeFlag) {
                return false;
            }
        list.add(element.right);
        } else {
            completeFlag = true;
        }
    }
        return true;
    }
}

Reference: Check the following link for a detailed explanation http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/check-if-a-given-binary-tree-is-complete-tree-or-not/

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Thanks for @Jonathan Graehl 's pseudo code. I've implemented it in Java. I've tested it against iterative version. It works like a charm!

public static boolean isCompleteBinaryTreeRec(TreeNode root){
//      Pair notComplete = new Pair(-1, false);
//      return !isCompleteBinaryTreeSubRec(root).equalsTo(notComplete);
    return isCompleteBinaryTreeSubRec(root).height != -1;
}

public static boolean isPerfectBinaryTreeRec(TreeNode root){
    return isCompleteBinaryTreeSubRec(root).isFull;
}

public static Pair isCompleteBinaryTreeSubRec(TreeNode root){
    if(root == null){
        return new Pair(0, true);
    }

    Pair left = isCompleteBinaryTreeSubRec(root.left);
    Pair right = isCompleteBinaryTreeSubRec(root.right);

    if(left.isFull && left.height==right.height){
        return new Pair(1+left.height, right.isFull);
    }

    if(right.isFull && left.height==right.height+1){
        return new Pair(1+left.height, false);
    }

    return new Pair(-1, false);
}

private static class Pair{
    int height;         
    boolean isFull;     

    public Pair(int height, boolean isFull) {
        this.height = height;
        this.isFull = isFull;
    }

    public boolean equalsTo(Pair obj){
        return this.height==obj.height && this.isFull==obj.isFull;
    }
}
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You can tell if a given binary tree is a left-complete binary tree - better known as a binary heap by ensuring that every node with a right child also has a left child. See below

bool IsLeftComplete(tree)
{

  if (!tree.Right.IsEmpty && tree.Left.IsEmpty)
    //tree has a right child but no left child, therefore is not a heap
    return false;    

  if (tree.Right.IsEmpty && tree.Left.IsEmpty)  
    //no sub-trees, thus is leaf node. All leaves are complete
    return true;

  //this level is left complete, check levels below
  return IsLeftComplete(tree.Left) && IsLeftComplete(tree.Right);
}
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No. There may be a node that has two complete trees of very different height as children. –  Svante Dec 4 '09 at 5:45
int height (node* tree, int *max, int *min) {

  int lh = 0 , rh = 0 ;
  if ( tree == NULL )
    return 0;
  lh = height (tree->left,max,min) ;
  rh = height (tree->right,max,min) ;
  *max = ((lh>rh) ? lh : rh) + 1 ;
  *min = ((lh>rh) ? rh : lh) + 1 ;
  return *max ;
}

void isCompleteUtil (node* tree, int height, int* finish, int *complete) {
  int lh, rh ;
  if ( tree == NULL )
    return ;
  if ( height == 2 ) {
    if ( *finish ) {
      if ( !*complete )
        return;
      if ( tree->left || tree->right )
        *complete = 0 ;
      return ;
    }
    if ( tree->left == NULL && tree->right != NULL ) {
      *complete = 0 ;
      *finish = 1 ;
    }
    else if ( tree->left == NULL && tree->right == NULL )
      *finish = 1 ;
    return ;
  }
  isCompleteUtil ( tree->left, height-1, finish, complete ) ;
  isCompleteUtil ( tree->right, height-1, finish, complete ) ;
}

int isComplete (node* tree) {
  int max, min, finish=0, complete = 1 ;
  height (tree, &max, &min) ;
  if ( (max-min) >= 2 )
    return 0 ;
  isCompleteUtil (tree, max, &finish, &complete) ;
  return complete ;
}
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