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I want to know what is the purpose of s in chmod.

 tiago2@ubuntu:~$ ls -l file
 -rw-r--r-- 1 tiago2 tiago2 0 2013-01-20 17:05 file
 tiago2@ubuntu:~$ chmod g+s file
 tiago2@ubuntu:~$ ls -l file
 -rw-r-Sr-- 1 tiago2 tiago2 0 2013-01-20 17:05 file

Thanks.

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closed as off topic by Mat, Mithrandir, tvanfosson, Sam Miller, Blue Moon Jan 20 '13 at 17:24

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

s stand for set.

The file permissions bits include an execute permission bit for file owner, group and other. When the execute bit for the owner is set to "s" the set user ID bit is set. This causes any persons or processes that run the file to have access to system resources as though they are the owner of the file. When the execute bit for the group is set to "s", the set group ID bit is set and the user running the program is given access based on access permission for the group the file belongs to.

The command:

chmod g+s file

sets the group ID bit on the file "file".

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And u+s? Thanks. –  tomss Jan 20 '13 at 17:17
    
g for group, u for user Set User Identification Attribute –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 20 '13 at 17:19
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