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I have the following code:

data_set = [1,2,3,4,5,6]

results  = []

data_set.each do |ds|
  puts "Before fork #{ds}"
  r,w = IO.pipe
  if pid = Process.fork
    w.close
    child_result = r.read
    results << child_result
  else
    puts "Child worker for #{ds}"
    sleep(ds * 5)
    r.close
    w.write(ds * 2)
    exit
  end
end

Process.waitall
puts "Ended everything #{results}"

Basically, I want each child to do some work, and then pass the result to the parent. My code doesn't run in parallel now, and I don't know where exactly my problem lies, probably it's because I'm doing a read in the parent, but I'm not sure. What would I need to do to get it to run async?

EDIT: I changed the code to this, and it seems to work ok. Is there any problem that I'm not seeing?

data_set = [1,2,3,4,5,6]

child_pipes = []
results     = []

data_set.each do |ds|
  puts "Before fork #{ds}"
  r,w = IO.pipe
  if pid = Process.fork
    w.close
    child_pipes << r
  else
    puts "Child worker for #{ds}"
    sleep(ds * 5)
    r.close
    w.write(ds * 2)
    exit
  end
end

Process.waitall
puts child_pipes.map(&:read)
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what about github.com/bruceadams/pmap? –  tokland Jan 20 '13 at 17:55
    
Do you really need to run each dataset in different processes? This could be way cleaner using threads. –  nbarraille Jan 20 '13 at 19:30
    
I know it could be cleaner using threads. This is just from a theoretical point of view. –  Tempus Jan 20 '13 at 22:40
    
@nbarraille unless the child's work is substantially IO, threads won't help concurrency unless running on rbx or jruby. The MRI GIL makes ruby threads useless for computation concurrency. –  dbenhur Jan 21 '13 at 0:24
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1 Answer

It's possible for a child to block writing to the pipe to the parent if its output is larger than the pipe capacity. Ideally the parent would perform a select loop on the child pipes or spawn threads reading from the child pipes so as to consume data as it becomes available to prevent children from stalling on a full pipe and failing. In practice, if the child output is small, just doing the waitall and read will work.

Others have solved these problems in reusable ways, you might try the the parallel gem to avoid writing a bunch of unnecessary code.

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