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Is it a good idea to create objects that cannot be changed in PHP?

For example a date object which has setter methods, but they will always return a new instance of the object (with the modified date).

Would these objects be confusing to other people that use the class, because in PHP you usually expect the object to change?

Example

$obj = new Object(2);

$x = $obj->add(5); // 7
$y = $obj->add(2); // 4
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Do you see any benefit in having classes that do this? I'd probably consider a better approach would be to simply deny settability (yes I made that up) on properties you don't want changing, forcing them to create a new instance if required. EDIT: Yea, what ThiefMaster said :) – Rudi Visser Jan 20 '13 at 17:18
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/7317037/… this example can help you to understend – misha-from-lviv Nov 16 '13 at 19:04
up vote 3 down vote accepted

An immutable object cannot be change after its initial creation so having setter methods makes no sense as it goes against that base principle.

You could implement some workarounds to simulate immutability in PHP by manipulating class member visibility and overriding the magic __set() method but its not guaranteed immutable as immutability is not a feature of the language. I believe someone once wrote an extension to provide an immutable value type in PHP though so you could google for that.

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Immutable objects don't have setter methods. Period.

Everyone will expect a setXyz() method to have a void return type (or return nothing in loosely typed languages). If you do add setter methods to your immutable object it will confuse the hell out of people and lead to ugly bugs.

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1  
well they wouldn't be called like set(), but I don't know how to call them. addetter methods? :) – Elfy Jan 20 '13 at 17:22
    
Although some amongst those "Everyone" won't be surprised to receive an instance of the setter's object, to allow for method chaining ;-) – Johan Fredrik Varen Apr 25 '14 at 13:53
    
@Elfy Call them "with" methods. $obj->withMyProp($x) returns a new instance with "MyProp" set to $x. – mpen Apr 21 '15 at 18:56

In my opinion objects should be immutable for value objects. Other than that it does not have much benefits unless you're sharing your object across your whole application.

There is some wrong answers here, an immutable object can have setters. Here's some implementation of immutable objects in PHP.

Example #1.

class ImmutableValueObject
{
    private $val1;
    private $val2;

    public function __construct($val1, $val2)
    {
        $this->val1 = $val1;
        $this->val2 = $val2;
    }

    public function getVal1()
    {
        return $this->val1;
    }

    public function getVal2()
    {
        return $this->val2;
    }
}

As you can see once instantiated you cannot changed any value.

Example 2: with setters:

class ImmutableValueObject
{
    private $val1;
    private $val2;

    public function __construct($val1, $val2)
    {
        $this->val1 = $val1;
        $this->val2 = $val2;
    }

    public function getVal1()
    {
        return $this->val1;
    }

    public function withVal1($val1)
    {
        $copy = clone $this;
        $copy->val1 = $val1;

        return $copy;    // here's the tric: you return a new instance!
    }

    public function withVal2()
    {
        return $this->val2;
    }

    public function withVal2($val2)
    {
        $copy = clone $this;
        $copy->val2 = $val2;

        return $copy;
    }
}

There is several implementation possible and this is by no means an exclusive list. And remember that with Reflection there is always a way to get around that in PHP, so immutability is all in your head in the end!

It is also often good practice to put immutable objects as final.

EDIT:

  • changed setX for withX
  • added comment about final
share|improve this answer
    
Should return $this; actually return $copy? – Kanstantsin Dec 8 '15 at 14:51
    
Fixed the error thanks for that – Théo Dec 8 '15 at 19:09
    
"In computer science, a mutator method is a method used to control changes to a variable. They are also widely known as setter methods".__An immutable object can't have setters__. His methods don't change internal state of the object. They just creates a new instance. That's a big different. – John Smith Mar 12 at 11:04
    
Also using 'setX' or 'changeX' names is a bad idea. These names strongly suggest that the internal state of the object will change. It's not true. Better practice is using for example 'withX'. – John Smith Mar 12 at 11:12
    
> An immutable object can't have setters_. His methods don't change internal state of the object. They just creates a new instance. Agreed, and that's what this setters do in this immutable object. Although I agree, having setX or changeX is a wrong naming for it in that case. – Théo Mar 12 at 15:15

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