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Could you have a look at what I've faced: http://sdrv.ms/WgafvN

And another screenshot: http://sdrv.ms/UZIp6H

The text of my function is:

bool print_all_points(POINT** pointer)
{

    if (pointer == NULL||is_array_empty(pointer)) 
    {
        cout << "The array of points is empty." << endl << endl;
        return false;
    }
    else
    {
        int n = _msize(pointer)/sizeof(pointer[0]);
        cout << "The list of points: " << endl<< endl;
        cout << "id (x, y)" << endl;
        cout << "----------" << endl;
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            cout << (*pointer[i]).id << " (" << (*pointer[i]).x << ", " << (*pointer[i]).y << ")" << endl;      
        }
    }
    return true;
}

This function is expected to print out all the points in an array. My problem is that it perfectly prints the array of 3 points rather than that of 4 points. At the 4th point it bites the dust.

I can't catch what the trouble is. From the picture it is visible that: 1. All 4 elements of the array are present. 2. It is correctly determined that there 4 of them.

What is the problem? Could you give me a kick here?

ADDED LATER.

The function which calls this:

POINT**  new_point(POINT** pointer, int occup)
{
    char x;
    char y;
    system("cls");
    cout << "INPUT A NEW POINT" << endl << endl;
    cout << "Input x: ";
    cin >> x;
    cout << "Input y: ";
    cin >> y;
    size_t m;
    if (pointer != NULL)
    {
        m = _msize(pointer);
    }

    POINT * tmp_point = new POINT();
    (*tmp_point).id = occup;
    (*tmp_point).x = x-48;
    (*tmp_point).y = y-48;  

    POINT** pn = new POINT * [occup];
    int necessary_memory = occup * 4; // ???? 4 is the size of a pointer.
    if (occup !=1)
    {
        memcpy(pn, pointer, necessary_memory);      
    }
    POINT ** tmp = new POINT * [occup];
    pn[occup - 1] = tmp_point;
    memcpy(tmp, pn, occup * sizeof(POINT)); 
    delete[] pn;
    pn = tmp;   
    size_t n = _msize(pn);
    cout << endl;
    print_all_points(pn);
    return pn;
}
share|improve this question
3  
What does _msize do? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 20 '13 at 17:39
2  
And you have allocated the memory for pointer with malloc, calloc or realloc as per the _msize manual page? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 20 '13 at 17:45
4  
Consider using std::vector<POINT>. –  lucasmrod Jan 20 '13 at 17:46
1  
lucasmod has a very valid point. In C++ there are very few reasons to use raw arrays or pointers. Using the standard library and its containers will make your life as a C++ programmer so much easier. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 20 '13 at 17:49
1  
My guess is that you are not allocating any memory for each POINT element, so your array is just an array of uninitialised pointers. –  Paul R Jan 20 '13 at 17:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

several problems:

  • not copying enough data in 64-bit

    int necessary_memory = occup * 4;
    

    should be

    int necessary_memory = occup * sizeof(POINT*);
    
  • copying too much data

    memcpy(tmp, pn, occup * sizeof(POINT)); 
    

    should be:

    memcpy(tmp, pn, occup * sizeof(POINT*)); 
    
  • Someone else can chime in, but I am not sure _msize should be used on memory allocated by new. Is that right? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z2s077bc(v=vs.80).aspx

  • fucntion in the title should be function

You're welcome. You owe me a beer.

Oh yea, I found my shoes... where would you like it?

share|improve this answer
    
A marvellous kick. Thank you very much. Beer from me. –  Pepperwork Jan 20 '13 at 18:19

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