Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have an MVVM Cross application running on Windows Phone 8 which I recently ported across to using Portable Class Libraries.

The view models are within the portable class library and one of them exposes a property which enables and disables a PerformanceProgressBar from the Silverlight for WP toolkit through data binding.

When the user presses a button a RelayCommand kicks off a background process which sets the property to true which should enable the progress bar and does the background processing.

Before I ported it to a PCL I was able to invoke the change from the UI thread to ensure the progress bar got enabled, but the Dispatcher object isn't available in a PCL. How can I work around this?

Thanks

Dan

share|improve this question
1  
I'm not entirely sure in win-phone, but can you use the Application.Current.Dispatcher to invoke the update? Or would it be Deployment.Current.Dispatcher? – Metro Smurf Jan 20 '13 at 17:51
up vote 12 down vote accepted

If you don't have access to the Dispatcher, you can just pass a delegate of the BeginInvoke method to your class:

public class YourViewModel
{
    public YourViewModel(Action<Action> beginInvoke)
    {
        this.BeginInvoke = beginInvoke;
    }

    protected Action<Action> BeginInvoke { get; private set; }

    private void SomeMethod()
    {
        this.BeginInvoke(() => DoSomething());
    }
}

Then to instanciate it (from a class that has access to the dispatcher):

var dispatcherDelegate = action => Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(action);

var viewModel = new YourViewModel(dispatcherDelegate);

Or you can also create a wrapper around your dispatcher.

First, define a IDispatcher interface in your portable class library:

public interface IDispatcher
{
    void BeginInvoke(Action action);
}

Then, in the project who has access to the dispatcher, implement the interface:

public class DispatcherWrapper : IDispatcher
{
    public DispatcherWrapper(Dispatcher dispatcher)
    {
        this.Dispatcher = dispatcher;
    }

    protected Dispatcher Dispatcher { get; private set; }

    public void BeginInvoke(Action action)
    {
        this.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(action);
    }
}

Then you can just pass this object as a IDispatcher instance to your portable class library.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a feasible approach - and it's basically exactly what MvvmCross does - only it does it using IoC at a platform setup level – Stuart Jan 20 '13 at 21:38
    
Thanks - that worked for me! – Dan Sadler Jan 20 '13 at 22:05
    
Your call... But, if you are using MvvmCross, then you'll probably find dev easier using InvokeOnMainThread(action) - as that will provide you with pre-built implementations on each platform (and it includes things like CheckAccess() calls before each Invoke) – Stuart Jan 20 '13 at 22:38

All the MvvmCross platforms require that UI-actions get marshalled back on to the UI Thread/Apartment - but each platform does this differently....

To work around this, MvvmCross provides a cross-platform way to do this - using an IMvxViewDispatcherProvider injected object.

For example, on WindowsPhone IMvxViewDispatcherProvider is provided ultimately by MvxMainThreadDispatcher in https://github.com/slodge/MvvmCross/blob/vnext/Cirrious/Cirrious.MvvmCross.WindowsPhone/Views/MvxMainThreadDispatcher.cs

This implements the InvokeOnMainThread using:

    private bool InvokeOrBeginInvoke(Action action)
    {
        if (_uiDispatcher.CheckAccess())
            action();
        else
            _uiDispatcher.BeginInvoke(action);

        return true;
    }

For code in ViewModels:

  • your ViewModel inherits from MvxViewModel
  • the MvxViewModel inherits from an MvxApplicationObject
  • the MvxApplicationObject inherits from an MvxNotifyPropertyChanged
  • the MvxNotifyPropertyChanged object inherits from an MvxMainThreadDispatchingObject

MvxMainThreadDispatchingObject is https://github.com/slodge/MvvmCross/blob/vnext/Cirrious/Cirrious.MvvmCross/ViewModels/MvxMainThreadDispatchingObject.cs

public abstract class MvxMainThreadDispatchingObject
    : IMvxServiceConsumer<IMvxViewDispatcherProvider>
{
    protected IMvxViewDispatcher ViewDispatcher
    {
        get { return this.GetService().Dispatcher; }
    }

    protected void InvokeOnMainThread(Action action)
    {
        if (ViewDispatcher != null)
            ViewDispatcher.RequestMainThreadAction(action);
    }
}

So... your ViewModel can just call InvokeOnMainThread(() => DoStuff());


One further point to note is that MvvmCross automatically does UI thread conversions for property updates which are signalled in a MvxViewModel (or indeed in any MvxNotifyPropertyChanged object) through the RaisePropertyChanged() methods - see:

    protected void RaisePropertyChanged(string whichProperty)
    {
        // check for subscription before going multithreaded
        if (PropertyChanged == null)
            return;

        InvokeOnMainThread(
            () =>
                {
                    var handler = PropertyChanged;

                    if (handler != null)
                        handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(whichProperty));
                });
    }

in https://github.com/slodge/MvvmCross/blob/vnext/Cirrious/Cirrious.MvvmCross/ViewModels/MvxNotifyPropertyChanged.cs


This automatic marshalling of RaisePropertyChanged() calls works well for most situations, but can be a bit inefficient if you Raise a lot of changed properties from a background thread - it can lead to a lot of thread context switching. It's not something you need to be aware of in most of your code - but if you ever do find it is a problem, then it can help to change code like:

 MyProperty1 = newValue1;
 MyProperty2 = newValue2;
 // ...
 MyProperty10 = newValue10;

to:

 InvokeOnMainThread(() => {
      MyProperty1 = newValue1;
      MyProperty2 = newValue2;
      // ...
      MyProperty10 = newValue10;
 });

If you ever use ObservableCollection, then please note that MvvmCross does not do any thread marshalling for the INotifyPropertyChanged or INotifyCollectionChanged events fired by these classes - so it's up to you as a developer to marshall these changes.

The reason: ObservableCollection exists in the MS and Mono code bases - so there is no easy way that MvvmCross can change these existing implementations.

share|improve this answer

Another option that could be easier is to store a reference to SynchronizationContext.Current in your class's constructor. Then, later on, you can use _context.Post(() => ...) to invoke on the context -- which is the UI thread in WPF/WinRT/SL.

class MyViewModel
{
   private readonly SynchronizationContext _context;
   public MyViewModel()
   {
      _context = SynchronizationContext.Current.
   }

   private void MyCallbackOnAnotherThread()
   {
      _context.Post(() => UpdateTheUi());
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.