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I was going through some stuff in the jQuery source, specifically the inArray method and I found this line of code:

i = i ? i < 0 ? Math.max( 0, len + i ) : i : 0;

What I am seeing is two ternary operators, but I have no idea how this is used. I understand how the ternary operator works, but I have never seen it used like this before. How does this piece of code work??

share|improve this question
    
Exactly how you'd expect; break it down. – Dave Newton Jan 20 '13 at 18:24
    
how bout: i = i ? ((i < 0) ? Math.max( 0, len + i ) : i) : 0; – thang Jan 20 '13 at 18:25
3  
People who write code like this without parentheses.. ugh – ThiefMaster Jan 20 '13 at 18:29
    
or people who write code like this.... show off, but doing it incorrectly. – thang Jan 20 '13 at 18:33
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just break it down like you would 1 + 2 + 3:

if (i) {
    if (i < 0) {
        i = Math.max(0, len + i);
    } else {
       i = i; // no-op
    }
} else {
    i = 0; // also no-op, since if `i` were anything else it would be truthy.
}

In fact, that whole line seems inefficient to me. Personally I'd just use:

if (i < 0) { 
    i = Math.max(0, len + i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clearing this up. Why do we do the Math.max(0, len+1)? I realize it's to find the biggest value, but why does this happen?? – Sethen Jan 20 '13 at 18:28
    
What does no-op stand for? – Kevin Bowersox Jan 20 '13 at 18:29
    
No operation. Nothing happens to the value. – Sethen Jan 20 '13 at 18:29
    
it's Math.max(i,len+i). that is an i not a 1. – thang Jan 20 '13 at 18:29
3  
The original ternary statement handles the case where i is undefined or false and sets it to 0. I think you'd be missing that in your shortened version. – Marc Baumbach Jan 20 '13 at 18:34

i = i ? i < 0 ? Math.max( 0, len + i ) : i : 0;

Breaks down to:

var i;

if(i){
  if(i<0){
   i = Math.max(0, len + i);
  }else{
    i = i;
  }
}else{
  i = 0;
}
share|improve this answer

By any chance, is "i" an index into an array and "len" the length of the array?

If it is so, then that line would do the following:

  • if i can be equated to false, then assume it's 0

  • else if i is positive or 0, then take it as it is

  • else if i is negative, then consider it an index counting from the end of the array (ie. if i==-1, it means the last element of the array).

share|improve this answer
i = i ? i < 0 ? Math.max( 0, len + i ) : i : 0;

reads to

i = i ? ( i < 0 ? Math.max( 0, len + i ) : i ) : 0;
share|improve this answer

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