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i'm stucking on a little and bad problem on a C program on linux... we know that when we make a fork the child process inherit some things expecially OPENED file descriptors(what i need). The problem is that i'm writing a multiprocess server application, I have a master process that accept new connections, creates sockets and put them in to a shared memory position. Now when the child process read one of these sockets from this shared memory, on a select i got an EBADF error! how the child process can read and use a socket(file descriptor in general) created by a parent process AFTER a fork? thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you call fork, the child process inherits copies of all open file descriptors. The typical way of doing this is for a parent process to open a listening socket, call accept which blocks until a connection arrives and then calls fork after receiving the connection. The parent then closes it's copy of the file descriptor, while the new child process can keep using the file descriptor and do any processing which is needed. Once the child is done it also closes the socket. It's important to remember two things: 1. The file descriptor / socket is a resource in the operating system and after the fork the parent and child each have a handle to that resource, which is kind of like a reference counted smart pointer. I explain this in more detail here. The second thing is that only file descriptors which are opened before calling fork are shared, because after forking parent and child are completely separate processes, even though they may share some resources like file descriptors which existed prior to the fork. If you're using a model where you want to have a parent handing out work to worker processes, it may be better for you to consider using threads, and a thread pool.

By the way, you can download allot of nice examples of servers and clients from Unix Network Programming website.

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You cannot transmit a socket (or any other file descriptor) from one process to another through shared memory. A file descriptor is just a small integer. Placing this integer in shared memory and accessing it from another process does not automatically make the same integer into a valid file descriptor from the point of view of the other process.

The correct way to send a file descriptor from one process to another is to send it as SCM_RIGHTS ancillary data with sendmsg() through an existing socket communication channel between the two processes.

First, create your communication channel with socketpair() before you fork(). Now, in the parent, close one end of the socket pair, and, in the child, close the other end. You can now sendmsg() from the parent on one end of this socket and receive with recvmsg() in the child using the other end.

Sending a message with SCM_RIGHTS looks something like this:

struct msghdr m;
struct cmsghdr *cm;
struct iovec iov;
char buf[CMSG_SPACE(sizeof(int))];
char dummy[2];    

memset(&m, 0, sizeof(m));
m.msg_controllen = CMSG_SPACE(sizeof(int));
m.msg_control = &buf;
memset(m.msg_control, 0, m.msg_controllen);
cm = CMSG_FIRSTHDR(&m);
cm->cmsg_level = SOL_SOCKET;
cm->cmsg_type = SCM_RIGHTS;
cm->cmsg_len = CMSG_LEN(sizeof(int));
*((int *)CMSG_DATA(cm)) = your_file_descriptor_to_send;
m.msg_iov = &iov;
m.msg_iovlen = 1;
iov.iov_base = dummy;
iov.iov_len = 1;
dummy[0] = 0;   /* doesn't matter what data we send */
sendmsg(fd, &m, 0);

Receiving a message with SCM_RIGHTS in it goes something like this:

struct msghdr m;
struct cmsghdr *cm;
struct iovec iov;
struct dummy[100];
char buf[CMSG_SPACE(sizeof(int))];
ssize_t readlen;
int *fdlist;

iov.iov_base = dummy;
iov.iov_len = sizeof(dummy);
memset(&m, 0, sizeof(m));
m.msg_iov = &iov;
m.msg_iovlen = 1;
m.msg_controllen = CMSG_SPACE(sizeof(int));
m.msg_control = buf;
readlen = recvmsg(fd, &m, 0);
/* Do your error handling here in case recvmsg fails */
received_file_descriptor = -1; /* Default: none was received */
for (cm = CMSG_FIRSTHDR(&m); cm; cm = CMSG_NXTHDR(&m, cm)) {
    if (cm->cmsg_level == SOL_SOCKET && cm->cmsg_type == SCM_RIGHTS) {
        nfds = (cm->cmsg_len - CMSG_LEN(0)) / sizeof(int);
        fdlist = (int *)CMSG_DATA(cm);
        received_file_descriptor = *fdlist;
        break;
    }
}
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i was talking about parent/child process, so the question is: How to child access to file descriptor made by the parent after a fork? –  user1995143 Jan 20 '13 at 20:23
    
+1 For a nice answer, but It sounds to me like he'd be better off using threads. –  Robert S. Barnes Jan 20 '13 at 20:45
    
@user1995143 That is exactly the question I answered. It doesn't matter what the parent/child relationship of the 2 processes is. As long as you have a UNIX domain socket as a communication channel, you can transmit file descriptors using this technique. Or you can follow Robert S. Barnes's suggestion and use multiple threads instead of multiple processes. Then you don't have to worry about it because file descriptors are shared between all threads of a single process. –  Celada Jan 20 '13 at 21:50

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