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What is “Best Practice” For Comparing Two Instances of a Reference Type?
How do I check for nulls in an '==' operator overload without infinite recursion?

I have a class called "Criterion" and i want to implement == operator,but I'm struggling with the following problem :

When i implement the == operator, I'm checking if one or both of my instances are null, but when i do it, it causes a recursive call for == and then i get "StackOverflow" (he he) exception.

Technically i can implement the Equals operator and not override the ==, but the code will be much more readable if i implement the == operator.

Here is my code :

public static bool operator == (Criterion c1, Criterion c2)
{
    if (null == c1)
    {
        if (null == c2)
            return true;
        return false;
    }
    if (null == c2)
        return false;                
    if ((c1.mId == c2.mId) && (c1.mName == c2.mName))
        return true;
    return false;
}
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marked as duplicate by Konrad Rudolph, Soner Gönül, HABO, Richard J. Ross III, DarthVader Jan 20 '13 at 19:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Generally we say if (c2 == null) {...} rather than the other way around –  ScruffyDuck Jan 20 '13 at 19:16
1  
dont do this. why are u doing this? stop! –  DarthVader Jan 20 '13 at 19:16
1  
have you read the MSDN? –  Venson Jan 20 '13 at 19:17
4  
@DarthVader Not very helpful. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 20 '13 at 19:18
1  
@DarthVader Bollocks. See the linked threads. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 20 '13 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

Try ReferenceEquals:

public static bool operator ==(Criterion c1, Criterion c2) {
    var nullC1 = ReferenceEquals(null, c1);
    var nullC2 = ReferenceEquals(null, c2);
    if (nullC1 && nullC2)
        return true;

    if (!nullC1 && !nullC2)
        if (c1.mId == c2.mId && c1.mName == c2.mName)
            return true;

    return false;
}
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+1 for reference type validation. –  sajanyamaha Jan 20 '13 at 19:22
    
you dont need Object in the beginning. –  DarthVader Jan 20 '13 at 19:24
    
@DarthVader Thanks for the readability suggestion! –  CC Inc Jan 20 '13 at 19:26
    
I would also use ReferenceEquals. But it is possible to specify which overload of == to call, just as for usual methods, so one can also say if ((object)null == (object)c1) { ... }. Actually it's probably enough to cast just one side of the == to object, not both, but I would cast both operands for clarity (or use ReferenceEquals). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 20 '13 at 19:26
    
this is wrong. this function is not doing anything useful. Instead it should impleemnt IEquatable<T>. i hope noone uses this. –  DarthVader Jan 20 '13 at 19:32

I'd do it like this:

bool isC1Null = Object.Equals(c1, null)
bool isC2Null = Object.Equals(c2, null)
if (isC1Null ^ isC2Null)
{
    return false
}
if (isC1Null && isC2Null)
{
    return true
}
//your code
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