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I noticed that the hash function code as part of java.util.Hashtable#get(K key) does the following: int index = (hash & 0x7FFFFFFF) % tab.length;. Is this binary 'and' operation meant only to reset the sign bit? and therefore avoid negative table access.

UPDATE: the fact that they 'and' with a 0x7FFFFFFF and not a 0xEFFFFFFF puzzled me. Why does the sign requires a full byte rather than a single bit?

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The index mus be positive and by clearing the highest bit it is sure that the value is positive. And will be positive after %. –  MrSmith42 Jan 20 '13 at 19:28
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Your update puzzles me. Both 0xE and 0x7 have a single bit unset. The only difference is which bit is unset: E is 1110 (so the fourth most significant bit is unset), while 7 is 0111 (so the most significant bit is unset). The sign bit is the most significant bit. –  delnan Jan 20 '13 at 20:56

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Yes, that's correct. This is to avoid negative indexing into the underlying array in the hash table.

Note that in languages with unsigned integer types like C or C++ this could be avoided by just using unsigned values in the hash function.

EDIT: Given your new question about why 0x7FFFFFF versus 0xEFFFFFF - the first of these numbers is all 1s with the top bit set to 0. The second of these does not have this property; it comes out to 1110 followed by lots of 1s. Therefore, masking with the first will clear the 1 bit, while masking with the second might not do this.

Hope this helps!

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the fact that they 'and' with a 0x7FFFFFFF and not a 0xEFFFFFFF puzzled me. Why does the sign requires a full byte rather than a single bit?

0x7FFFFFFF is just the top bit. In binary it is 01111111111111111111111111111111. Where as 0xEFFFFFFF is 11101111111111111111111111111111 so it would mask out a different bit.

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