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I'm just starting out in C++, and I'm running into an error I can't fix.

Here's all my code so far (can't even get hello world to work):

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <windows.h>


int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
               LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
                   MessageBox(NULL, L"Hello World!",
                       L"Hello World!",
                       MB_ICONEXCLAMATION | MB_OK);
                   return 0;
}

But that gives this error when I try to run it:

Test.cpp(11): error C2373: 'WinMain' : redefinition; different type modifiers C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\include\winbase.h(2588) : see declaration of 'WinMain'

When I look at the declaration of WinMain, I see that there is an "__in" before each of the parameters. I tried adding that, but had no luck. I also tried replacing WINAPI with CALLBACK, but that didn't work either.

share|improve this question
    
Try building with the stdafx.h include commented out - there may be some macro in there causing problems. What version of VS are you using? Can you post the build log? –  Michael Burr Jan 20 '13 at 20:07
    
It is LPWSTR, not LPSTR. –  Hans Passant Jan 20 '13 at 20:15
1  
@HansPassant according to the docs, LPSTR is correct - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms633559(VS.85).aspx –  oefe Jan 20 '13 at 20:22
    
Try using INT WinMain(...){...} instead of int WINAPI WinMain(...){...} –  user1219742 Jan 20 '13 at 20:23
    
@Michael Burr, I tried that, but it didn't work. –  EnvisionRed Jan 20 '13 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The simple solution is to

    Use a standard main function.

Like this:

#undef UNICODE
#define UNICODE
#incude <windows.h>

int main()
{
    MessageBox(
        0,
        L"Hello World!",
        L"Hello World!",
        MB_ICONEXCLAMATION | MB_SETFOREGROUND
        );
}

Now your only problem is to build it as a GUI subsystem application using Microsoft's toolset, which is a bit more than retarded in this respect (the GNU toolchain does not have such a problem).

For that, with Microsoft's link, use this linker option (in addition to selecting the GUI subsystem): /entry:mainCRTStartup.

Note that you can put that option in an environment variable called LINK.

Happy coding! :-)

share|improve this answer
    
You can also tell the visual studio to compile a console application, that will automatically switch to main() as entry point. Concerning the defining/undefining of the UNICODE macro, that's also easier to achieve by setting the charset option in the general tab of the project settings. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Jan 20 '13 at 19:49
    
@doomster: i'm pretty sure the OP does not want a console window. concerning the "easier" for the choice of macro set (UNICODE), no that's a pretty bad idea. code should stand on its own so that it can easily be moved or copied between projects, or built with other tools, not being dependend on details specified in some version-specific Visual Studio config file. Besides, it's absolutely not easier to click your way around in the visual studio project config, than to type two short lines at the top of the file. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 20 '13 at 19:51
    
The more typical linker option to use is to set /SUBSYSTEM:WINDOWS. –  jamesdlin Jan 20 '13 at 20:14
    
Just curious: What does the L in the beginning mean? –  0x499602D2 Jan 20 '13 at 20:15
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf But isn't the point of the WinMain function to provide the handles to instances of your program, so you can do stuff like prevent more than one instance from being open, and use command-line options? The options can be accomplished with a standard main function, but how would I accomplish the former? –  EnvisionRed Jan 20 '13 at 20:54

WinMain is a C function, therefore you need to wrap it with extern "C"

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <windows.h>

extern "C"
{

    int CALLBACK WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
               LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
    {
                   MessageBox(NULL, L"Hello World!",
                       L"Hello World!",
                       MB_ICONEXCLAMATION | MB_OK);
                   return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This did not work. –  EnvisionRed Jan 20 '13 at 22:01

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