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I develop an Android app which allows a user to view a TV Guide in various ways. One of the views is a Now/Next view which is basically a list with separators (showing channel names) with each separator followed by the current / next TV show details.

The problem I'm having is with testing my own line-up of 67 channels it takes anything from 20-30 seconds to generate the view (horribly slow for mobile apps) and I know some of my users have ~200+ channels.

The SQL query I use to get the Now/Next details for 1 channel is as follows...

SELECT
    b.oid AS _id,
    b.channel_oid,
    b.title,
    b.start_time,
    b.end_time
FROM epg_event b,
    (
        SELECT
            MIN(a.start_time) AS start_time,
            a.channel_oid,
            a.end_time
        FROM epg_event a
        WHERE a.start_time  > datetime('now')
          AND a.channel_oid = 10029
        GROUP BY a.channel_oid
        UNION
        SELECT
            MIN(a.start_time) AS start_time,
            a.channel_oid,
            a.end_time
        FROM epg_event a
        WHERE a.start_time <= datetime('now')
          AND a.end_time    > datetime('now')
          AND a.channel_oid = 10029
        GROUP BY a.channel_oid
    ) c
WHERE c.start_time  = b.start_time
  AND c.channel_oid = b.channel_oid
ORDER BY b.start_time

That seems pretty complex for a query where I just want to pull 2 records where the start time of the first is before (or equal to) the current time and end time is after current time (Now) and the second record has a start time which matches the end time of the first (Next).

I'm just wondering if there is a more efficient way to query for this sort of scenario.

The epg_event table is created with the following (in order to illustrate the schema)...

CREATE TABLE [EPG_EVENT] (
    [oid] integer PRIMARY KEY,
    [title] varchar(50),
    [subtitle] varchar(50),
    [description] varchar(50),
    [start_time] datetime,
    [end_time] datetime,
    [channel_oid] int,
    [unique_id] varchar(50),
    [rating] varchar(50),
    [original_air_date] datetime,
    [season] int,
    [episode] int,
    [dvb_service_event_id] int,
    [dvb_table_version] int,
    [genres] varchar(50)
)

The query shown will return...

_id, channel_oid, title, start_time, end_time
10467376, 10029, Ripper Street, 2013-01-20 21:00:00, 2013-01-20 22:00:00
10467377, 10029, BBC News; Regional News and Weather, 2013-01-20 22:00:00, 2013-01-20 22:25:00
share|improve this question
    
Schema? Example data? – CL. Jan 20 '13 at 20:53
    
Must this work in Android versions before Jelly Bean? (Your query doesn't.) – CL. Jan 20 '13 at 20:57
    
@CL. : I've edited the question to show the CREATE TABLE used for the table. As for it working on versions before Jelly Bean, I can promise you it does - my HTC Desire running Froyo runs the query fine (albeit slowly). – Squonk Jan 20 '13 at 21:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I can tell, this part of your query is supposed to get any show that either still being aired or has not started yet:

    SELECT
        MIN(a.start_time) AS start_time,
        a.channel_oid,
        a.end_time
    FROM epg_event a
    WHERE a.start_time  > datetime('now')
      AND a.channel_oid = 10029
    GROUP BY a.channel_oid
    UNION
    SELECT
        MIN(a.start_time) AS start_time,
        a.channel_oid,
        a.end_time
    FROM epg_event a
    WHERE a.start_time <= datetime('now')
      AND a.end_time    > datetime('now')
      AND a.channel_oid = 10029
    GROUP BY a.channel_oid

But, these 2 conditions are equivalent to condition that show has not ended yet, or to:

    SELECT
        MIN(a.start_time) AS start_time,
        a.channel_oid,
        a.end_time
    FROM epg_event a
    WHERE a.end_time    > datetime('now')
      AND a.channel_oid = 10029
    GROUP BY a.channel_oid

Now, here you filter by known channel_oid and yet GROUP BY it - why? It should be simplified as

    SELECT
        MIN(a.start_time) AS start_time,
        a.channel_oid,
        a.end_time
    FROM epg_event a
    WHERE a.end_time > datetime('now')
      AND a.channel_oid = 10029

As far as I can tell, you are probably better off replacing datetime('now') with CURRENT_TIMESTAMP. This yields your final SQL as:

SELECT
    b.oid AS _id,
    b.channel_oid,
    b.title,
    b.start_time,
    b.end_time
FROM epg_event b,
    (
        SELECT
            MIN(a.start_time) AS start_time,
            a.channel_oid,
            a.end_time
        FROM epg_event a
        WHERE a.end_time > CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
          AND a.channel_oid = 10029
    ) c
WHERE c.start_time  = b.start_time
  AND c.channel_oid = b.channel_oid
ORDER BY b.start_time

To make it work fast, make sure to create proper indexes. This answer can give you some ideas how to optimize it, but on first look, you should have at least following compound indexes on epg_event table: (channel_oid, start_time) and (channel_oid, end_time).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I actually got a bit of help with my original query as SQL isn't my strong point - I've no idea why the guys who helped me used GROUP BY. I've condensed my query down to the one you suggest although it only returns 1 record (the Now Showing one) so I added the UNION back in and it works. The real fix however was the compound indexes - without them your condensed query wasn't noticeably quicker but when I added them it really made a difference (1-2 seconds instead of 20-30 seconds). Thanks again. – Squonk Jan 23 '13 at 22:48
    
Glad to hear it helped you! Compound indexes can really make your day :-) – mvp Jan 23 '13 at 23:15

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