Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am storing a 2D array that represents a distance matrix between vectors as a Dictionary<DistanceCell, double>. My implementation of DistanceCell has two string fields representing the vectors being compared.

class DistanceCell
{
    public string Group1 { get; private set; }
    public string Group2 { get; private set; }

    public DistanceCell(string group1, string group2)
    {
        if (group1 == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("group1");
        }

        if (group2 == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("group2");
        }

        this.Group1 = group1;
        this.Group2 = group2;
    }
}

Since I'm using this class as a key, I overrode Equals() and GetHashCode():

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    // False if the object is null
    if (obj == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // Try casting to a DistanceCell. If it fails, return false;
    DistanceCell cell = obj as DistanceCell;
    if (cell == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    return (this.Group1 == cell.Group1 && this.Group2 == cell.Group2) 
           || (this.Group1 == cell.Group2 && this.Group2 == cell.Group1);
}

public bool Equals(DistanceCell cell)
{
    if (cell == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    return (this.Group1 == cell.Group1 && this.Group2 == cell.Group2) 
           || (this.Group1 == cell.Group2 && this.Group2 == cell.Group1);
}

public static bool operator ==(DistanceCell a, DistanceCell b)
{
    // If both are null, or both are same instance, return true.
    if (System.Object.ReferenceEquals(a, b))
    {
        return true;
    }

    // If either is null, return false.
    // Cast a and b to objects to check for null to avoid calling this operator method
    // and causing an infinite loop.
    if ((object)a == null || (object)b == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    return (a.Group1 == b.Group1 && a.Group2 == b.Group2) 
           || (a.Group1 == b.Group2 && a.Group2 == b.Group1);
}

public static bool operator !=(DistanceCell a, DistanceCell b)
{
    return !(a == b);
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    int hash;
    unchecked
    {
        hash = Group1.GetHashCode() * Group2.GetHashCode();
    }

    return hash;
}

As you can see, one of the requirements of DistanceCell is that Group1 and Group2 are interchangeable. So for two strings x and y, DistanceCell("x", "y") must equal DistanceCell("y", "x"). This is why I implemented GetHashCode() with multiplication because DistanceCell("x", "y").GetHashCode() must equal DistanceCell("y", "x").GetHashCode().

The problem that I'm having is that it works correctly roughly 90% of the time, but it throws a KeyNotFoundException or a NullReferenceException the remainder of the time. The former is thrown when getting a key from the dictionary, and the latter when I iterate over the dictionary with a foreach loop and it retrieves a key that is null that it then tries to call Equals() on. I suspect this has something to do with an error in my GetHashCode() implementation, but I'm not positive. Also note that there should never be a case where the key wouldn't exist in the dictionary when I check it because of the nature of my algorithm. The algorithm takes the same path every execution.

Update

I just wanted to update everyone that the problem is fixed. It turns out that it had nothing to do with my Equals() or GetHashCode() implementation. I did some extensive debugging and found that the reason I was getting a KeyNotFoundException was because the key didn't exist in the dictionary in the first place, which was strange because I was positive that it was being added. The problem was that I was adding the keys to the dictionary with multiple threads, and according to this, the c# Dictionary class isn't thread-safe. So the timing must have been perfect that an Add() failed and thus the key was never added to the dictionary. I believe this can also explain how the foreach loop was bringing up a null key on occasion. The Add()'s from multiple threads must have messed up some internal structures in the dictionary and introduced a null key.

Thanks to every one for your help! I'm sorry that it ended up being a fault entirely on my end.

share|improve this question
    
Your DistanceCell class is not sealed. Are you sure no-one derives from DistanceCell? Your Equals methods don't check if obj or cell is of a more derived type than this (or vice versa). You should include those checks, or mark your class sealed. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 20 '13 at 21:09
    
@Jeppe I don't have any classes that derive from DistanceCell, so this shouldn't be a problem, but I'll mark it as sealed to be safe. –  StrangerLoop Jan 20 '13 at 21:16
add comment

3 Answers

I believe what is missing for you is this answer Using an object as a generic Dictionary key in .net

You probably not stating you implement IEquatable interface

share|improve this answer
1  
One does not have to implement IEquatable<>. It might be nice to do so, but overriding Equals and GetHashCode is sufficient. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 20 '13 at 20:25
    
I tried doing this but still received a KeyNotFoundException. –  StrangerLoop Jan 20 '13 at 20:46
add comment

Take a look at this blog post by Eric Lippert

It says that the result of GetHashCode should never change even if you change the content of the object. The reason is that Dictionary is using buckets for faster indexing. Once you change the GetHasCode result, the Dictionary will not be able to find the right bucket for your object and this can lead to "Key not found"

I might be wrong, but it is worth testing.

share|improve this answer
    
This is where I would start looking. GetHashCode() should never compute based on mutable fields. Actually, I would avoid overriding it unless you are 110% sure what you are doing. The default is an auto-incremented value that should work just fine. –  SiLo Jan 20 '13 at 20:22
    
This might be the correct answer. Even if the setters of the properties are private. The question is: Are Group1 and Group2 ever changed outside the constructor? It looks as if the asker showed us the full code of the class? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 20 '13 at 20:28
1  
@SiLo My DistanceCell object shouldn't be mutable though. The only fields that it has are the two strings Group1 and Group2, which are only set when the constructor is called. –  StrangerLoop Jan 20 '13 at 20:32
    
@Jeppe Yes, this was the full code of my DistanceCell class. –  StrangerLoop Jan 20 '13 at 20:33
    
@StrangerLoop Oh, you are correct. I misread them as custom classes named Group1 and Group2, assuming they might have their own GetHashCode() implementations. My apologies, I'll take another look. That being said, I'd still recommend you remove your GetHashCode() override for the DistanceCell class. –  SiLo Jan 20 '13 at 20:35
show 1 more comment

To me your code looks correct. (It can possibly be (micro-)optimized, but it looks as if it will be correct in all cases.) Can you provide some code where you create and use the Dictionary<DistanceCell, double>, and things go bad? The problem may lie in code you haven't shown us.

share|improve this answer
    
The code is quite long and there's a lot of steps that happen to calculate the vectors before I use the distance matrix. I am going to do some more testing, and if I can't find anything, I'll post code that could replicate this issue. –  StrangerLoop Jan 20 '13 at 21:37
1  
You were right, the code here was correct. The problem was that I was adding to the dictionary from multiple threads which caused a key to be missing on occasion. Thanks for all your attempts at helping me figure this out! –  StrangerLoop Jan 21 '13 at 17:08
    
Ah, someone should have mentioned "Dictionary<,> is not thread-safe", but a good thing you found out (the hard way). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 21 '13 at 21:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.