Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The question of how to have related SQLAlchemy mapped classes spread across different modules has come up quite a few times here. None of the proposed solutions quite work for me though, and I'd be curious to know how this is properly handled (i.e. I don't want to just get my code runnable, I'd like to do it right).

I really like this solution:

base.py

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
Base = declarative_base()

a.py

from sqlalchemy import *
from base import Base
from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = "A"
    id  = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    Bs  = relationship("B", backref="A.id")
    Cs  = relationship("C", backref="A.id")

b.py

from sqlalchemy import *
from base import Base

class B(Base):
    __tablename__ = "B"
    id    = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    A_id  = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("A.id"))

c.py

from sqlalchemy import *
from base import Base

class C(Base):
    __tablename__ = "C"    
    id    = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    A_id  = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("A.id"))

main.py

from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship, backref, sessionmaker

import base

import a
import b
import c

engine = create_engine("sqlite:///:memory:")
base.Base.metadata.create_all(engine, checkfirst=True)
Session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)
session = Session()

# snip

But what if I want to be able to do stuff with the A class in a.py, beyond defining it? e.g.

a.py

from sqlalchemy import *
from base import Base
from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship
import main

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = "A"
    id  = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    Bs  = relationship("B", backref="A.id")
    Cs  = relationship("C", backref="A.id")

def populate_A(session):
    for i in range(10):
        new_A = A(id=i)
        session.add(new_A)
    session.commit()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    session = main.Session()
    populate_A(session)

This is how I'd like to structure my code - semantically, A and populate_A seem like they should live in the same module. But obviously this doesn't work in the above example, because of the circular a -> main -> a import.

So would I typically define A somewhere (a.py) and then do stuff in a separate module that imports main (a_functions.py ?). Or, since creating the session doesn't require importing the mapped classes but creating the tables does, do I put those two functionalities in different modules? Or do I do something gross in main.py like

def create_tables():
    import a, b, c
    engine = create_engine("sqlite:///:memory:")
    base.metadata.create_all(engine)

So that a, b, and c are only conditionally imported when I need to create the tables, avoiding a circular import?

In short, what does the idiomatic high-level organization of a package using SQLAlchemy look like?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm not understanding why you need to call "main" from within "A". Usually, a Python application has one point of entry, in this case it seems like the "main.py" module would be that point. The part where you're doing something with "main" in "A" has no relationship to populate_A(), that function can live inside of a.py without issue. –  zzzeek Jan 21 '13 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

I think this was actually a problem of Python idioms, rather than SQLAlchemy idioms. According to Guido Van Rossum, running scripts within a package is an anti-pattern (zzeek hinted at this in a comment). So a.py, b.py and c.py shouldn't have if __name__ == '__main__' blocks.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.