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public class Simulation extends Thread {
    private volatile boolean loopState = true;

    public void stopLoop() {
        loopState = false;
    }

    public void run() {     
        try {
            Robot r = new Robot();

            while (loopState) {
                r.keyPress(KeyEvent.VK_LEFT);
                r.keyRelease(KeyEvent.VK_LEFT);
                sleep(50);
            }
        } catch (AWTException | InterruptedException e) {}
    }
}

When I launch stopLoop() the while loop below doesn't stop. If I print the value of loopState at the end of the stopLoop() call it returns false but the loop is still executing.

I use this code to call the methods.

Simulation simulation = new Simulation();
    switch (PressedButtonID) {
        case 14:
            simulation.start();
            break;
        case 15:
            simulation.stopLoop();
            break;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Can you rewrite this without extending Thread as this is generally a very bad idea? This pattern should work so I suspect you are doing something else wrong. I would add a print statement to be sure the loop is still iterating and you haven't buffered up the key strokes. – Peter Lawrey Jan 20 '13 at 21:21
5  
Don't catch exceptions in empty blocks. At least an e.printStackTrace() would be helpful. – Dan Jan 20 '13 at 21:22
2  
print the value of loopState in the inner while... – ggrandes Jan 20 '13 at 21:23
    
The value in the while is always true. – xXDraklordXx Jan 20 '13 at 21:30
4  
can you post the code in which you call the methods ? – Alya'a Gamal Jan 20 '13 at 21:49
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your posted code works perfectly, as the following simple program demonstrates: as you can see, the while loop stops as expected. The problem is somewhere else.

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.KeyEvent;

public class Simulation extends Thread {
    private volatile boolean loopState = true;

    public void stopLoop() {
        loopState = false;
    }

    public void run() {
        try {
            Robot r = new Robot();

            while (loopState) {
                r.keyPress(KeyEvent.VK_LEFT);
                r.keyRelease(KeyEvent.VK_LEFT);
                System.out.println("Simulation loop: CALLED");
                sleep(50);
            }
        } catch (AWTException | InterruptedException e) {}
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Simulation simulation = new Simulation();
        simulation.start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        simulation.stopLoop();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know what to do now... – xXDraklordXx Jan 20 '13 at 22:11
    
First accept the answer, if it has convinced you :) Second, debug your program until you find out where it goes wrong... – lbalazscs Jan 20 '13 at 22:13
    
Maybe you are generating events faster that they are being consumed. If so, there will be a backlog being processed even after the loop generating them has fininshed. How long does your Robot take to handle each even? More than 50 millis? – jop Jan 22 '13 at 8:53

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