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I have one form and a button inside it, how can i toggle the window height, so when i click on the button for the first time, the window height will increase by 166, and when i click on the button for the second time, the height will be decreased by 166.

Sorry for the question being stupid but i got really confused ;thanks

 private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        int  FormHeight = this.Height;
        int  FormHeightBefore = FormHeight;

        if (this.Height == FormHeightBefore)
        {//toggle off 
            this.Height = this.Height + 166;
        }
        else { 
        //toggle on
            this.Height = this.Height - 166;
        }

    }

I tried with the code above but the it doesn't worked, Whenever i press the button, the form height still increasing

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted
partial class Form1 {
    public int FormHeight;

    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        this.Height += (FormHeight = (FormHeight > 0 ? -1 : 1) * 166);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Well I guess he didn't say the answer had to have a good readability... – Austin Brunkhorst Jan 20 '13 at 21:54
    
I don't know .. – Ken Kin Jan 20 '13 at 21:55
    
No, it changes itself, but I agree that it's not very readable. – Ofer Zelig Jan 20 '13 at 21:56
    
In fact, I configured my VS to remove those spaces .. – Ken Kin Jan 20 '13 at 22:07

Notice your first 2 lines:

int  FormHeight = this.Height;
int  FormHeightBefore = FormHeight;

You're actually always setting both variables to the current height...

So the same if statement is always called...

This will work correctly:

const int heightOffset = 166;
int  FormHeightBefore = this.Height
private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (this.Height == FormHeightBefore)
    {//toggle off 
        this.Height += heightOffset ;
    }
    else
    { 
       //toggle on
        this.Height = FormHeightBefore;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot the ; at the end of first line... Besides, it's not so elegant to use the "magic" number 166 twice. – Ofer Zelig Jan 20 '13 at 21:44
    
@OferZelig I was still editing the answer... Fixed. – Blachshma Jan 20 '13 at 21:45
    
Why don't use the number 166 twice ?c @OferZelig – Rafik Bari Jan 20 '13 at 21:46
    
There was no point to edit, I've already wrote the right full answer... @ShikataGaNai - because when you come back to change the number, you might forget one of them. – Ofer Zelig Jan 20 '13 at 21:47
    
@ShikataGaNai - I'm guessing he's talking about using a constant instead of just writing 166. Notice I used the heightOffset constant. This is better since it allows you to easily change this value in the future (instead of searching the entre code for 166) – Blachshma Jan 20 '13 at 21:47

You can do something like this.

bool isExpanded;

private void button2_click(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
    Height += (isExpanded ? -166 : 166);

    isExpanded = !isExpanded;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Buggy, why 10 ? – Ofer Zelig Jan 20 '13 at 21:46
1  
Why 10? Why 166? – Austin Brunkhorst Jan 20 '13 at 21:47
    
Because that's what he asked for, you've changed his logic... – Ofer Zelig Jan 20 '13 at 21:48
1  
I see what you mean now - I've update my answer. – Austin Brunkhorst Jan 20 '13 at 21:52

Your code fails because every time you enter the method (via button's click), it checks for the current form height and considers it to be the "initial one".

Do something like:

private readonly int initialHeight;

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    initialHeight = this.Height;
}

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{

    if (this.Height == initialHeight)
    {   // increase height
        this.Height = initialHeight + 166;
    }
    else { 
        // decrease height
        this.Height = initialHeight;
    }
}

Note that the initial initialHeight declaration is outside the scope of your button's click event.

share|improve this answer
    
A constant would be better then just "166" – Blachshma Jan 20 '13 at 21:48
    
Don't agree, depends on the actual use. If it's used in only one place and there's no special logical meaning for that (that is - it does not represent a meaningful constant that is worth describing in English), then it's OK. – Ofer Zelig Jan 20 '13 at 21:50
1  
Your code doesn't work, "the word this doesn't exist in the current context" @OferZelig – Rafik Bari Jan 20 '13 at 21:50

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