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ARC seems very nice but there are one or two edge cases that the typical naming conventions/rules don't make clear to me. Look at the following category implementation around NSThread:

@interface NSThread (BlockAdditions)
- (void)performBlock:(dispatch_block_t)block;
@end

@implementation NSThread (BlockAdditions)
- (void)internal_performBlock:(dispatch_block_t)block
{
    block();
}

- (void)performBlock:(dispatch_block_t)block
{
    [self performSelector:@selector(internal_performBlock:)
                 onThread:self
               withObject:[block copy]
            waitUntilDone:NO];
}

My question is: does block leak after calling -copy? How would the compiler know when to release the block? Instruments does not detect a leak but that does not convince me, given what I know about ARC, that this case is handled correctly. Thanks for any info!

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That would leak in retain/release, but should not leak in ARC.

The compiler sees the -copy and that implies that a -release is needed. If you look at the generated assembly, that should be exactly what you see.

(well, exactly what you see once you wade through the assembly, which isn't exactly straightforward.)

Note that you can simplify the assembly by just compiling the [block copy];.

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The compiler sees that block is copied in the method performBlock:. This creates a new object in the method and every object created in a method must be released before the method returns, unless this object is returned, in which case it must be autoreleased, since once a method returns, the compiler has no reference to variables in the method any longer and thus could never release it.

So your method is roughly translated to

- (void)performBlock:(dispatch_block_t)block
{
    dispatch_block_t blockCopy;

    blockCopy = [block copy];
    [self performSelector:@selector(internal_performBlock:)
                 onThread:self
               withObject:blockCopy
            waitUntilDone:NO];

    // If method returns, how shall the compiler access blockCopy any longer?
    // It can't! And since blockCopy is not returned by the method, it must
    // be destroyed before the method returns.
    [blockCopy release];
}

You may wonder, why this code does not crash then, wouldn't blockCopy be deallocated? No, since performSelector:onThread:withObject:waitUntilDone: retains the object you pass to it as withObject: argument until it performed the selector callback, after that it releases the object again. So when release is called at the end of performBlock:, blockCopy has a retainCount of 2 and this release decreases it to 1, but not to 0, thus it is not released. Only after your selector has been called on the other thread, blockCopy is released again and since your called selector has not retained it, it will finally be deallocted.

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Good explanation outside the use of absolute retain counts..... –  bbum Jan 21 '13 at 1:54
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