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I have a line in my prog which I use to launch additional instances of my program:

a=subprocess.Popen(__file__)

and under linux it works ok.

But under osx, it doesnt create a new window as it should (the program is a Tkinter program), yet it doesnt give any error at all. (and I checked that _file_ is in fact the correct name of the running program, wich is executable)

The return is this:

>    pprint (vars(a))
{'_child_created': True,
 'pid': 38865,
 'returncode': None,
 'stderr': None,
 'stdin': None,
 'stdout': None,
 'universal_newlines': False}

any hints?

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to start with the same python executable and to pass the same command-line arguments: p = Popen([sys.executable] + sys.argv). –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 21 '13 at 0:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have an embarrassing problem there. You know what ? Your window is simply hidden behind the other one created earlier.

To see that, make the latest created window to be shown in front of the first one as in:

import Tkinter
import subprocess

if __name__ == "__main__":
    try:
        open('bluh_check')
    except IOError:
        open('bluh_check', 'w').close()
        x = subprocess.Popen(['python', __file__])
        print vars(x)
        title = 'there'
    else:
        title = 'hi'

    root = Tkinter.Tk()
    root.title(title)
    root.withdraw()
    root.deiconify()
    root.mainloop()
share|improve this answer
    
it was even more embarassing: my prog silently exits if called without an argument, and I just provided __file__ to it. I found the best solution is to call it simply as a=subprocess.Popen(sys.argv): the 0th list value is the program name, all the rest its command line arguments –  alessandro Jan 21 '13 at 12:57

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