Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In a specific project I am (at the moment) only allowed to use JRE6 for execution of a Java application. Therefore, I configured maven-compiler-plugin with 1.6 for both source and target.

In my Maven dependencies, I included a dependency that itself targets 1.7 and also uses 1.7 features like try-with-resources -- which I assumed would lead to some compile-time error or warning in my own project (I'm using Eclipse). But it doesn't, so my question is: Is it possible to detect such problems before running the application (or tests) on the specific target JRE which in my case is JRE6?

share|improve this question
    
Kind of tricky. I know of a Ning plugin that can comb through dependency versions, but I didn't see any options to check the class file versions. I know that javac will complain if it finds a linked class having a too new version - can you trace the Maven output and confirm the javac options? You aren't 100% safe anyway, even with the error. I will have to post an answer, running out of space here. – Mihai Danila Jan 21 '13 at 3:17

Although just a partial answer, I found a solution for Mihai's mentioned issue with different library signatures. There is the Animal Sniffer Maven Plugin which lets you specify a certain Java runtime that it checks against in some phase (e.g. test).

But this doesn't solve the class file version problem, as Maven simply swallows (-nowarn) those warnings from javac, as explained in a comment to this question.

share|improve this answer

(I'll make this an interactive answer; I don't have an answer just yet.)

Kind of tricky. I know of a Ning plugin that can comb through dependency versions, but I didn't see any options to check the class file versions. I know that javac will complain if it finds a linked class having a too new version - can you trace the Maven output and confirm the javac options?

You aren't 100% safe anyway, even with the error. I will have to post an answer, running out of space here. Here is an anecdotal account that I encountered. It features Java 1.4 and Java 5, but it will serve to clarify why you can still get in trouble.

The anecdote will serve to back the opinion that you should strive to keep your libraries on the same (or lower) level than their consumers, and always compile with the proper JDK.

Anyway, here goes. Say you compile the line new java.math.BigInteger(1) for Java 1.4. You use the Java 5 compiler with a 1.4 target, so all sounds good. But the Java 5 core libraries include a BigInteger constructor that takes an int argument, so your class will be built with a reference to that constructor. Unfortunately, Java 1.4 does not have this version of the BigInteger constructor and you will get a runtime error if you later run this code in a 1.4 JVM. What would have happened with a proper Java 1.4 compiler is that an internal cast from int to double would have been produced by the compiler to serve the proper constructor taking a double.

share|improve this answer
    
So, I found out some details... First, Maven calls the JDK7 compiler by default on my system and I don't know how to change it. Second, it adds -target 1.5 and -source 1.5, but also -nowarn. If I compile it manually without -nowarn, I get no errors in JDK7 obviously, but using javac of JDK6 I get "Warning: ...: major version 51 is newer than 50, the highest major version supported by this compiler" for those classes/interfaces I use directly. – neo Jan 21 '13 at 8:59
    
That said, I think this is quite a fundamental problem. Particularly with your BigInteger example, because even if library authors are aware of setting -source and -target correctly, they often use the newest JDK for compiling. In my opinion, Maven should turn those warnings into errors and require using a target-version javac. Couldn't this be realized as a Maven plugin? If not extending maven-compiler-plugin itself. – neo Jan 21 '13 at 9:09
    
If compiling in Maven with the proper JDK is an option that you can pursue, then check out this Maven page (also linked to from my answer) to learn rhow to configure Maven to build with the proper JDK. That should save you if at least one of your modules has the Java 7 library as a direct dependency. – Mihai Danila Jan 21 '13 at 11:36
    
Hmm yes I saw that, but I don't like it at all. The reason being that contributors of such project can't start right away and have to set the jvm path somewhere. I guess this might also make problems with CI systems, at least you would have to configure them, too. – neo Jan 21 '13 at 19:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.