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This is my generic C++ game loop:

std::vector<std::unique_ptr<State>> states;

while(window.isOpen())
{
    //event checking and other stuff

    for(size_t i = 0; i < states.size(); i++)
    {
        states[i]->Update();

        //clear backbuffer
        states[i]->Draw(window);
        //draw backbuffer
    }
}

The problem is that whenever I remove a state from the states list the program crashes. I'm guessing it's because once the state has been removed you can no longer use the object because its obviously not there any more.

I'm pretty sure the best way to fix this is to copy the states inside the states vector into a new one and just make any changes that I want to the states vector that way no changes will be made during the loop.

So this is what I came up with:

std::vector<std::unique_ptr<State>> states;
std::vector<State> tempStates;

while(window.isOpen())
{
    //event checking and other stuff

    for(size_t i = 0; i < states.size(); i++)
    {
        tempStates.push_back(*states[i]);
    }

    for(size_t i = 0; i < tempStates.size(); i++)
    {
        tempStates[i].Update();

        //clear backbuffer
        tempStates[i].Draw(window);
        //draw backbuffer
    }

    tempStates.clear();
}

But I get an error once building the application saying error C2259: 'State' : cannot instantiate abstract class in file xmemory0. "State" is my abstract base class that other states inherit from. I don't understand why I'm getting this error because I'm not instantiating that abstract class, I'm instantiating a class that inherits from it. states isn't full of State objects it's full of objects that inherit from it which I guess would make it full of State objects in a way, but regardless I'm not instantiating them.

So why do I get this error and how can I solve it?

Thanks.

EDIT

This is basically how an element inside states gets removed when using the first method described above. This is inside a class that inherits from State:

void Update()
{
    if(/*whatever*/)
    {
        StateManager::RemoveState(std::unique_ptr<State>(this));
        //call stack comes back here but cant because this no longer exists
    }
}

StateManager.cpp

void StateManager::RemoveState(std::unique_ptr<State> state)
{
    states.erase(std::remove(states.begin(), states.end(), state), states.end());
}
share|improve this question
    
Show a typical code example of how states get removed. –  Kerrek SB Jan 21 '13 at 0:42
1  
So your basic problem is that StateManager is unaware of the active iteration of the very thing it is "managing", problem contributed to by states being able to essentially shoot their own head off and extricate themselves from the StateManager's collection mid-iteration? It almost seems like you should let each state mark itself for death, then have the StateManager sweep up the bodies at the end of each loop iteration. Would that solve your problem ? –  WhozCraig Jan 21 '13 at 1:22
    
@WhozCraig Precisely! Yes, that is the problem. I've implemented this brilliant solution and it works as expected. –  MrPlosion1243 Jan 21 '13 at 2:17
    
@ProgrammerGuy123 nothing brilliant about it. But glad it worked for you. I hope it does, anyway ("as expected' might not be a good thing when you 'expect' it to fail =P). –  WhozCraig Jan 21 '13 at 2:18

1 Answer 1

Perhaps it would be simple to transfer the elements you want to delete:

std::vector<unique_ptr<state>> states;

while ( /* stuff */)
{
    std::vector<unique_ptr<state>> temp;

    for (std::size_t i = 0; i != states.size(); ++i)
    {
        if ( /* move? */)
        {
            temp.push_back(std::move(states[i]));
        }
    }

    for (std::size_t i = 0; i != temp.size(); ++i)
    {
        // process temp[i]
    }
}

The removed elements will be null pointers in the states vector at the end of each loop body, so you may wish to prune those:

states.erase(std::remove(states.begin(), states.end(), nullptr), states.end());

(At the moment there aren't any std::copy_if and std::move_if algorithms, but once they're added to the standard library, this code will become a lot shorter.)

share|improve this answer
    
Transfer the elements I wish to delete? Those elements your transferring I don't want deleted, I wan't those elements preserved so that next iteration I can't draw and update them again so I'm sure I follow you. If you mean make this your game loop then this does not work because like you said the elements will be null on the second iteration so there is nothing to be transferd from states. This concept doesn't make since to me because I need to duplicate the elements inside statessomewhere else (in a temp vector). –  MrPlosion1243 Jan 21 '13 at 1:22
    
@MrPlosion1243: Maybe a shared_ptr is more useful in that case? Or just do a temp.swap(states); at the end of the loop? –  Kerrek SB Jan 21 '13 at 1:26

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