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I have a bunch of classes in my C# program that contain a static member, which is a dictionary collection of all instances of that class - something like this:

class A
{
  private static Dictionary<int,A> dict = new Dictionary<int, A>();
  public static A GetInstance(int handle) { return dict[handle];}

  public A(int handle) {this._handle = handle; dict[handle] = this;}
  ~A() { dict.Remove(_handle);}
  private int _handle;

}

I've got this duplicated in a number of classes, and would like to factor out this common code, but can't figure out how do this. Putting it into a plain base class does not work, as I want a new collection for each concrete class. I sense there must be a way to do it with generics, but I can't quite see how at the moment.

For example, this is not right:

abstract class Base<T>
{
  private static Dictionary<int,T> dict = new Dictionary<int, T>();
  public static T GetInstance(int handle) { return dict[handle];}

  public A(int handle) {this._handle = handle; dict[handle] = this;}
  ~Base() { dict.Remove(_handle);}
  private int _handle;
}

class A : Base<A>
{
}

It fails to complile as the constructor of A is not right. Am I missing a trick here?

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4  
Don't do this; it's a memory leak. Your finalizers will never run. (and you shouldn't be using finalizers in the first place) –  SLaks Jan 21 '13 at 0:53
    
@SLaks Could this be realized through IDisposable implementation instead of finalizers? –  horgh Jan 21 '13 at 0:57
    
@KonstantinVasilcov: It would still be a bad idea. –  SLaks Jan 21 '13 at 1:29
    
This is not a question about resource management; I have intentionally left out details pertaining to that. Telling me not to do something is not helpful (particularly telling me that I shouldn't be using finalizers). –  Tom Davies Jan 21 '13 at 8:31

1 Answer 1

This is my variant using IDisposable interface implementation:

class Base<T> : IDisposable
    where T : Base<T>, new()
{
    private static Dictionary<int, T> dict = new Dictionary<int, T>();
    private static T Get(int handle)
    {
        if (!dict.ContainsKey(handle))
            dict[handle] = new T(); //or throw an exception
        return dict[handle];
    }
    private static bool Remove(int handle)
    {
        return dict.Remove(handle);
    }

    public static T GetInstance(int handle)
    {
        T t = Base<T>.Get(handle);
        t._handle = handle;
        return t;
    }

    protected int _handle;

    protected Base() { }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Base<T>.Remove(this._handle);
    }
}

class A : Base<A> { }

And use it then:

using (A a = Base<A>.GetInstance(1))
{

}

Here you do not have a public constructor for any of the classes deriving from Base<T>. While static factory GetInstance method should be used to create instances. Remember that instances are removed from the dictionary only when Dispose method is called, so you should either use using statement or call Dispose manually.

However I guess you still should take into consideration the comment by SLaks.

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