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My bootstrapper.ts that gets run from the main.ts entry point looks like this (minus the references heading):

import Dialogs = App.Widgets.Dialogs;
declare var $ : JQueryStatic;


export class Bootstrapper { 
    static SiteLoad() { 
       var dialog = new Dialogs.LoginDialog();
       ...
    }
}

However, when main.ts attempts to load this file the first line immediately throws a reference error. That's when I realized importing an internal module doesn't add any dependencies to the define wrapper of the generated .js file.

So then how do I resolve internal modules at run-time? Is it the case that AMD is only compatible with external modules and I have to load internal ones along with external libraries in the entry point in main.ts?

I prefer the aliases syntax of internal modules over external ones. The code I have above looks much cleaner than when using external module syntax:

import Dialogs = module("Modules/App.Widgets.Dialogs");
declare var $ : JQueryStatic;


export class Bootstrapper { 
    static SiteLoad() { 
       var dialog = Dialogs.App.Widgets.Dialogs.LoginDialog(); //Seriously?
       ...
    }
}

That's just ugly. What to do?

UPDATE:

Steve, the approach you suggest has a limitation. In my original approach using internal modules I can do the following:

import Dialogs = App.Widgets.Dialogs;

declare var $ : JQueryStatic;

export class Bootstrapper { 
    static SiteLoad() { 

        var loginDialog1 = new Dialogs.LoginDialog();  //Instantiation      -OK
        var loginDialog2: Dialogs.LoginDialog;         //Type-Declaration   -OK
    }
}

In the approach you suggest I lose the ability to use the alias for type declarations:

import DialogsModule =  module("Modules/App.Widgets.Dialogs");

var Dialogs : DialogsModule.App.Widgets.Dialogs;

declare var $ : JQueryStatic;

export class Bootstrapper { 
    static SiteLoad() { 

        var loginDialog1 = new Dialogs.LoginDialog();   //Instantiation  -OK        
        var loginDialog2: Dialogs.LoginDialog;  //Type-Declaration -ERROR: The name "Dialogs" does not exist in the current context  
        var loginDialog3: DialogsModule.App.Widgets.Dialogs.LoginDialog;  //Must use full name instead
    }
}
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can alias a long module path like this:

import DialogModule = module("Modules/App.Widgets.Dialogs");
var dialogs = DialogModule.App.Widgets.Dialogs;
declare var $ : JQueryStatic;

export class Bootstrapper { 
    static SiteLoad() { 
       var dialog = dialogs.LoginDialog();
       ...
    }
}

You can mix AMD with plain JavaScript by including the appropriate files yourself - but I recommend picking one pattern to use in your program to make things simpler to understand.

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Edited OP describing why this approach is not suitable. Not sure what you mean by "mix AMD with plain Javascript.. did you mean to explicitly write define wrappers in the ts file and avoid TS module("") syntax altogether? Is that what is comes down to for a cleaner solution? –  parliament Jan 21 '13 at 19:07
    
Yeah - not the clearest explanation. I meant mixing use of a module loader with manually adding additional script tags, so you have some static scripts and some being loaded by a module loader. –  Steve Fenton Jan 21 '13 at 21:07
    
I see. Ok, there seems to be no clean solution to aliasing that's consistent with type declarations. I'll ultimately end up with mixing patterns or using long module names that don't even make any sense (ex "Dialogs.App.Widgets.Dialogs"). So I've decided to forgoe using module definition syntax all together as it does not work like C# namespaces as I had originally thought. –  parliament Jan 22 '13 at 16:01
    
Instead I've organized my "namespace structure" using folders (ex: "/Scripts/App/Widgets/Dialogs.ts" for the Dialog module above) and treating the files themselves as the modules (writing my module exports directly to global scope). That's the only way I can get clean aliasing that works with type-declarations as well. Ex: import Dialogs = module("App/Widgets/Dialogs"); var loginDialog1 = Dialogs.LoginDialog(); //GOOD var loginDialog2: Dialogs.LoginDialog; //Also good. –  parliament Jan 22 '13 at 16:01
1  
Checking back here I have since ditched the approach I said above and refactored my code to use Steve's approach described here: stevefenton.co.uk/Content/Blog/Date/201301/Blog/… coupled with additional organization described here: stackoverflow.com/a/13850286/1267778 Single-class per file compiled into a single file is definitely the way to go. –  parliament Mar 18 '13 at 0:45
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