Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why is this enum declared in its own file. Is there an advantage to this? Also how would I be able to put this in one of the 2 files. I really have no clue what I am doing. Please also explain this in a simple way, since this is a textbook example, and I am fairly new to Java.

ScaleName.java

enum ScaleName {celsius, fahrenheit, kelvin, rankine};

Temperature.java

class Temperature {

    private double number;
    private ScaleName scale;

    public Temperature() {
        number = 0.0;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }

    public Temperature(double number) {
        this.number = number;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }

    public Temperature(ScaleName scale) {
        number = 0.0;
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public Temperature(double number, ScaleName scale) {
        this.number = number;
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public void setNumber(double number) {
        this.number = number;
    }

    public double getNumber() {
        return number;
    }

    public void setScale(ScaleName scale) {
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public ScaleName getScale() {
        return scale;
    }
}

UseTemperature.java

class Temperature {

    private double number;
    private ScaleName scale;

    public Temperature() {
        number = 0.0;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }

    public Temperature(double number) {
        this.number = number;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }

    public Temperature(ScaleName scale) {
        number = 0.0;
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public Temperature(double number, ScaleName scale) {
        this.number = number;
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public void setNumber(double number) {
        this.number = number;
    }

    public double getNumber() {
        return number;
    }

    public void setScale(ScaleName scale) {
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public ScaleName getScale() {
        return scale;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
See also Enums. –  trashgod Jan 21 '13 at 2:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't have to declare an enum in a separate file. You could do this:

public class Temperature {
    public enum ScaleName {celsius, fahrenheit, kelvin, rankine};

    private double number;
    private ScaleName scale;

    public Temperature() {
        number = 0.0;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }
    ...
}

The only difference between this and making the enum a top level class is that you now need to qualify the name of the enum when you use it in a different class.

But what is going on here is no different to what happens if the enum was a regular class. (And an enum is implicitly static, so we don't need a static keyword ...)

share|improve this answer

Enums are not just bare values in Java, they are much more than that. They are classes in their own right (they inherit Object). And consider these:

public enum Int {
    ONE(1),
    TWO(2);

    private final int value;

    Int(final int value) { this.value = value; }

    public int getValue() { return value; }

    @Override
    public String toString() { return "I am integer " + value; }
}

Consider also:

public enum Operation
{
    PLUS
        {
            @Override
            public int calculate(final int i1, final int i2)
            {
                return i1 + i2; 
            }
        };

    public abstract int calculate(int i1, int i2);
}

final int ret = Operation.PLUS.calculate(2, 3);

And you can combine them both, too. They are very powerful tools.

share|improve this answer
    
I am sure that this is a great answer, and makes sense, to somebody more advanced then I. However your code is much more complicated then the syntax that I know so far. I am learning, not an expert. –  user1943931 Jan 21 '13 at 1:59
    
You can equally use simple enums: public enum Const { VALUE1, VALUE2 }. But the thing is, they are classes (with some pecularities), so they are used as such ;) –  fge Jan 21 '13 at 2:00

An enum is a class and follows same regulations.

Having it on its own file is exactly like moving an inner class in a separate file, nothing more nor less. So yes you can move it inside one of the class and be able to access it from outside with OuterClass.ScaleName syntax.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.