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Why is this enum declared in its own file. Is there an advantage to this? Also how would I be able to put this in one of the 2 files. I really have no clue what I am doing. Please also explain this in a simple way, since this is a textbook example, and I am fairly new to Java.

ScaleName.java

enum ScaleName {celsius, fahrenheit, kelvin, rankine};

Temperature.java

class Temperature {

    private double number;
    private ScaleName scale;

    public Temperature() {
        number = 0.0;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }

    public Temperature(double number) {
        this.number = number;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }

    public Temperature(ScaleName scale) {
        number = 0.0;
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public Temperature(double number, ScaleName scale) {
        this.number = number;
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public void setNumber(double number) {
        this.number = number;
    }

    public double getNumber() {
        return number;
    }

    public void setScale(ScaleName scale) {
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public ScaleName getScale() {
        return scale;
    }
}

UseTemperature.java

class Temperature {

    private double number;
    private ScaleName scale;

    public Temperature() {
        number = 0.0;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }

    public Temperature(double number) {
        this.number = number;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }

    public Temperature(ScaleName scale) {
        number = 0.0;
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public Temperature(double number, ScaleName scale) {
        this.number = number;
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public void setNumber(double number) {
        this.number = number;
    }

    public double getNumber() {
        return number;
    }

    public void setScale(ScaleName scale) {
        this.scale = scale;
    }

    public ScaleName getScale() {
        return scale;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
See also Enums. – trashgod Jan 21 '13 at 2:01
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Why is an enum declared in a separate file, in Java?

You don't have to declare an enum in a separate file. You could do this:

public class Temperature {
    public enum ScaleName {celsius, fahrenheit, kelvin, rankine};

    private double number;
    private ScaleName scale;

    public Temperature() {
        number = 0.0;
        scale = ScaleName.fahrenheit;
    }
    ...
}

The only difference between this and making the enum a top level class is that you now need to qualify the name of the enum when you use it in a different class.

But what is going on here is no different to what happens if the enum was a regular class. (And an enum is implicitly static, so we don't need a static keyword ...)


Why is this enum declared in its own file.

Because the code author chose to do it this way.

Is there an advantage to this?

Yes. It means that don't have to qualify the enum to use it ... in some circumstances where you would have to if the enum was nested as above.


Actually, Java does allow you to put multiple top-level classes into the same source file provided that all but one of the classes is "package private". However, doing that is generally thought to be bad style, and it can be problematic for some tool chains ... I have heard.

share|improve this answer
    
If you are placing the enumeration in its own file, you do not need to wrap it in a class as above. You can simply declare the enumeration as "public enum ScaleName" right inside ScaleName.java file, and then you do not need to qualify the name. – Mark Eldridge Oct 26 '15 at 13:41
    
Didn't I already say that? ("The only difference ....") – Stephen C Oct 26 '15 at 14:05

Enums are not just bare values in Java, they are much more than that. They are classes in their own right (they inherit Object). And consider these:

public enum Int {
    ONE(1),
    TWO(2);

    private final int value;

    Int(final int value) { this.value = value; }

    public int getValue() { return value; }

    @Override
    public String toString() { return "I am integer " + value; }
}

Consider also:

public enum Operation
{
    PLUS
        {
            @Override
            public int calculate(final int i1, final int i2)
            {
                return i1 + i2; 
            }
        };

    public abstract int calculate(int i1, int i2);
}

final int ret = Operation.PLUS.calculate(2, 3);

And you can combine them both, too. They are very powerful tools.

share|improve this answer
    
I am sure that this is a great answer, and makes sense, to somebody more advanced then I. However your code is much more complicated then the syntax that I know so far. I am learning, not an expert. – user1943931 Jan 21 '13 at 1:59
    
You can equally use simple enums: public enum Const { VALUE1, VALUE2 }. But the thing is, they are classes (with some pecularities), so they are used as such ;) – fge Jan 21 '13 at 2:00

An enum is a class and follows same regulations.

Having it on its own file is exactly like moving an inner class in a separate file, nothing more nor less. So yes you can move it inside one of the class and be able to access it from outside with OuterClass.ScaleName syntax.

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