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I have a following stata code which I am trying to convert to R:

dataframe

    y1  y2  y3  y4  y5  y6  y11 y12 y13 y14 y15 y16
    5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   1   2   1   2   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   2   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   1   8   1   2   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   2   0   0
    0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   2   0   0
    1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
    2   2   5   1   1   2   2   2   1   1   2       1

local z1 "y1 y12 y3 y4 y5 y6"
local z2 "y11 y12 y13 y14 y15 y16"
local i = 1
local n : word count `z1'
gen k=.

while `i'<=`n' {

    local z1`i' : word `i' of `z1'
        local z2`i' : word `i' of `z2'
        replace k=max(0,`z1`i'')*(`z2`i''==2|`z2`i''==1)
        local i=`i'+1
    } 

Expected output:

k
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

I used the following equivalent R code:

      dataframe$z1<- "y1 y12 y3 y4 y5 y6"
      dataframe$z2<- "y11 y12 y13 y14 y15 y16"
      i<-  1
      n<-sapply(gregexpr("\\W+", z1), length) + 1
      dataframe$k<-NA

    for (j in i:n){
  .... #I wanted to refer to each word of z1 
  ...#e.g.,dataframe$z1[i]<-which gives word i of z1 
  .. #I wanted to refer to each word of z2
  ... #e.g.,dataframe$z1[i]<-whicg gives word i of z2 

   dataframe$k<-with(dataframe, pmax(0,z1[j])*ifelse(z2[j] %in% c(1,2),1,0))

}

The dotted lines indicate that I was not able to find the equivalent code in R. I would appreciate if you could help me in this regard.

    # Updated Stata codes and data (number of observation is reduced to 10)

y1  y2  y3  y4  y5  y6  y11 y12 y13 y14 y15 y16
5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0

y111    y112    y113    y114    y115    y116    y1111   y1112   y1113   y1114   y1115   y1116
1   0   0   0   0   0   81000   0   0   0   0   0
1   0   0   0   0   0   86000   0   0   0   0   0
1   0   0   0   0   0   96000   0   0   0   0   0
1   0   0   0   0   0   84000   0   0   0   0   0
1   0   0   0   0   0   76000   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0

    local z1 "y1 y2 y3 y4 y5 y6"
    local z2 "y11 y12 y13 y14 y15 y16"
    local z3 "y111 y112 y113 y114 y115 y116"
    local z4 "y1111 y1112 y1113 y1114 y1115 y1116"
    local i = 1
    local n : word count `z1'
    gen k=.
    gen r=0
    gen s=0
    gen t=0
    while `i'<=`n' {

        local z1`i' : word `i' of `z1'
            local z2`i' : word `i' of `z2'
            local z3`i' : word `i' of `z3'
            local z4`i' : word `i' of `z4'


            replace k=max(0,`z4`i'')*(`z1`i''==5|`z1`i''==10|`z2`i''==2|`z2`i''==1|`z3`i''==1)
            replace r=r+k if `i'<=3
            replace s=s+k if `i'>3
            replace t=t+k
            local i=`i'+1
        } 

#Expected output

t       r   s       k
81000   81000   0   0
86000   86000   0   0
96000   96000   0   0
84000   84000   0   0
76000   76000   0   0
0           0   0   0
0           0   0   0
0           0   0   0
0           0   0   0
0           0   0   0
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by joran, Ananda Mahto, Dason, Muhammad Reda, bipen Jan 22 '13 at 14:39

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9  
It would be great if you added what exactly you want the script to do for those of us who know R but not stata. –  mathematical.coffee Jan 21 '13 at 2:30
1  
I'm still a bit confused. I mean something like "Take the columns from z1 and z2 in pairs, e.g. columns y1 and y11, and then find the maximum value in column z1 if the corresponding value (in that row??) of column z2 is 1 or 2, and 0 otherwise". (I am struggling to understand how your expected output comes about). –  mathematical.coffee Jan 21 '13 at 2:45
8  
It might make things more clear if you were to make the example smaller. –  Matthew Lundberg Jan 21 '13 at 3:08
3  
You are using terminology that is foreign to R users. There is no data type in R that is a "word". The data appears "numeric" and R has "numeric vectors". We also have "character vectors" and lists. I'm guessing your efforts at constructing data.frames are flawed and that you really need to be studying the ?"[[" page more carefully. You really should explain in English what you are trying to do. For us, Stata is more "foreign" than English. –  BondedDust Jan 21 '13 at 4:53
2  
@DWin: I agree with the spirit of your comment, but "For us" no doubt means "For most of us R users". –  Nick Cox Jan 21 '13 at 10:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Nick makes a good point that your max call doesn't reference the previous k, so it collapses to a check of the sixth column. Here's the R-equivalent, assuming you really wanted the row maximum. I stored your data in a txt file first.

data_all <- read.table("data.txt", header=T)
data_one <- data_all[,1:6]
data_two <- data_all[,7:12]
my_fun_one <- function(x, y) {
  x * ((y == 1) | (y == 2))
}
data_three <- mapply(FUN = my_fun_one, x=data_one, y=data_two)
my_fun_two <- function(x) {
  max(x, 0)
}
k <- apply(data_three, 1, FUN = my_fun_two)

This yields

> k
 [1] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Update -- here's the solution to your updated, full problem. It uses, more or less, the same building blocks. Once you're familiar with the basics of R, I think you will get the most mileage out of apply, lapply, and mapply.

data_one <- read.table("data_one.txt", header=T)
data_two <- read.table("data_two.txt", header=T)
z1 <- data_one[, 1:6]
z2 <- data_one[, 7:12]
z3 <- data_two[, 1:6]
z4 <- data_two[, 7:12]
my_fun <- function(w, x, y, z) {
  z * (z > 0) * ((w %in% c(5, 10)) | (x %in% c(1, 2)) | (y == 1))
}
z5 <- mapply(FUN=my_fun, w=z1, x=z2, y=z3, z=z4)
r <- rowSums(z5[, 1:3]) 
s <- rowSums(z5[, 4:6]) 
t <- rowSums(z5)
k <- z5[, ncol(z5)]
data_three <- data.frame(t, r, s, k)

This yields:

> data_three
       t     r s k
1  81000 81000 0 0
2  86000 86000 0 0
3  96000 96000 0 0
4  84000 84000 0 0
5  76000 76000 0 0
6      0     0 0 0
7      0     0 0 0
8      0     0 0 0
9      0     0 0 0
10     0     0 0 0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the solution. But, this is slightly different from what I got in Stata. As per @Nick, we are doing rowwise, so the last output should be 2 not 5. Can you please re-check that? –  Metrics Jan 21 '13 at 14:12
1  
@user1493368 Then why bother checking all columns? Just do generate k = max(0, y6) * (y16 == 1 | y16 == 2)? Why loop through all columns if you're only using the last column? –  Richard Herron Jan 21 '13 at 17:20
    
@ Richard: I assume that you are familiar with the Stata. I think the updated Stata code needs the loop. –  Metrics Jan 21 '13 at 17:41
1  
@user1493368 -- Yes, I know Stata and R, but I'm not sure what is your goal in either language. –  Richard Herron Jan 21 '13 at 18:46
    
: Stata simple code is provided below by @Nick. That's my goal. –  Metrics Jan 21 '13 at 21:00

The Stata code makes little sense any way. With the data given, the code is looping over the variables y1, ..., y6 and the variables y11, ..., y16. It sets a new variable k to missing initially, but regardless of what is true for previous variables the result will be

max(0, y6) * (y16 == 2|y16 == 1)

which should be more transparent to R users than most of the code presented. The function max() returns the larger of its arguments and operates rowwise.

I doubt that is what is intended, but I will not try to guess what is intended.

share|improve this answer
    
@ Nick: Thanks for explaining the Stata code. I agree that the code makes little sense because it is only a part of the original codes. –  Metrics Jan 21 '13 at 13:47
1  
@1493368: That's no answer at all to my mind. What's upstream or downstream of this code makes no difference to what it does. The code is self-contained and it ignores everything except the last two variables, y6 and y16 in your example. If that's the intended result, it's absurdly round-about, meaning that you do not need a loop at all. On the evidence here my guess remains that the Stata code is incorrect. Also, if you don't understand what the code is intended to do, how can you evaluate R translations of it? –  Nick Cox Jan 21 '13 at 15:12
    
Agree, but that's not the intended result. I do really need a loop and I can refer to the original code, if you are interested. You are right! As, I am learning to program both in Stata and `R, I may not to be able to fully grasp what is going behind the codes. Anyway, thanks again for the explanation. –  Metrics Jan 21 '13 at 15:53
1  
I don't understand your stance here. The key question is whether the Stata code you gave us can possibly be correct. Further, if that code differs from the "original code", whatever that is, we really cannot comment on what you do not show us. As before: If you know you need a loop, the Stata code is wrong. This possibly underlies why, as you indicate, the Stata code and the R code as written by Richard don't agree. I will post as another answer a more modern Stata version of your code. –  Nick Cox Jan 21 '13 at 16:06
    
I will update the Stata code, so that it can closely reflects the original code. –  Metrics Jan 21 '13 at 16:12

This is a shorter version of the original Stata code. It takes as given Stata variables (columns, vectors) y1...y6 and y11...y16.

gen k = .

forval i = 1/6 {
    replace k = max(0, y`i') * (y1`i' == 2|y1`i' == 1)
} 

The forval loop cycles over 1,2,3,4,5,6. There is macro substitution so that first time round the loop the RHS is max(0, y1) * (y11 == 2|y11 == 1) and last time round the loop the RHS is max(0, y6) * (y16 == 2|y16 == 1). Hence the result coming out of the loop is inevitably the result of the last calculation.

(Edit) I confirm that none of the local statements is needed.

(Second edit) I am also assuming that y12 in the original local z1 "y1 y12 y3 y4 y5 y6" was a typo for y2.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the short Stata code. I have now updated the Stata code to reflect the original code. Please let me know whether I can still avoid the local statements in this case. –  Metrics Jan 21 '13 at 17:14

The Stata code can be simplified, as already signalled, to

gen k = .
gen r = 0
gen s = 0
gen t = 0
quietly forval i = 1/6 {
replace k = max(0, y111`i')*(y`i'==5|y`i'==10|y1`i'==2|y1`i'==1|y11`i'==1)
     replace r = r+k if `i'<=3
     replace s = s+k if `i'>3
     replace t = t+k
} 

The revised code does make clear why overwriting k is no problem, as each new result for k is always used promptly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. This is easier to understand than the original code.Your code also helped me to figure out the reason for the use of local statement in the original code. –  Metrics Jan 21 '13 at 20:58

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