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I have a following code:

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    int i = 3;
    do {
        (i == 3) ? (std::cout << "Is 3.\n") : ++i;
        ++i;

    } while ( i < 4 );
    return 0;
}

And got a following error in response:

ternary.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
ternary.cc:5:43: error: invalid conversion from ‘void*’ to ‘int’ [-fpermissive]

What is wrong with my code?

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6  
The ternary operator requires both parts to be of the same type. –  chris Jan 21 '13 at 4:33
3  
Don't write code like this. –  ta.speot.is Jan 21 '13 at 4:34
    
@chris oh, thank you. that solves the problem. what should I do now with my question? –  yauser Jan 21 '13 at 4:35
    
@ta.speot.is you mean that I shouldn't use ternary operator? –  yauser Jan 21 '13 at 4:36
1  
The ternary operator is not a replacement for if...else. It is an operator. Use if...else in your case –  cha Jan 21 '13 at 4:36
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're abusing the ternary operator a bit, for any given a ? b : c I would expect the result to be stored somewhere and I wouldn't recommend b or c having side effects.

The root of your problem is that the ternary operator requires b and c to be the same/equivalent type. Andrew's explanation that they need to be able to "resolve to the same ... type" is probably more accurate.

For what it's worth, you can use a sleight-of-hand (or even more abuse, depending on your perspective) to make the code work:

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    int i = 3;
    do {
        (i == 3) ? (std::cout << "Is 3.\n", 0) : ++i;
        ++i;

    } while ( i < 4 );
    return 0;
}

Or, more explicitly, make sure both are the same type:

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    int i = 3;
    do {
        (i == 3) ? (std::cout << "Is 3.\n") : (void*)++i;
        ++i;

    } while ( i < 4 );
    return 0;
}
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The ternary operator requires that the two alternatives resolve to the same data type. You can't use it in the way you have.

The compiler is telling you the two types are different — it can't convert from void* (type of the first path) to int (type of the second path).

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1  
This always surprises people who have come to think of it as an alternate form of if-else. –  Mark Ransom Jan 21 '13 at 4:41
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