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(Um,My english is not well) :)

My friend is learning C++ now,and he find a problem that I can't explain why.

The First Code ,it runs more than 2000MS

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio> 
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

int ans[2000000];
char a[2000000];

int main()
{
    scanf("%s\n",a);
    int l=1,r=strlen(a);
    for (int i=0;i<strlen(a);i++) 
        if (a[i]=='l')
            ans[r--] = i+1;
        else
            ans[l++] = i+1;
    for (int i=1;i<=strlen(a);i++)
        printf("%d\n",ans[i]);
    return 0;
}

The Second Code,it runs 465MS

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

int ans[2000000];
char a[2000000];
int size;

int main()
{
    scanf("%s",a);
    int l=1,r=strlen(a);
    size = r;
    for (int i=0;i<strlen(a);i++) 
        if (a[i]=='l') ans[r--]=i+1;else ans[l++]=i+1;
    for (int i=1;i<=size;i++)
        printf("%d\n",ans[i]);
    return 0;
}

The Third Code,it runs more than 2000MS

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

int ans[2000000];
char a[2000000];
int size;

int main()
{
    scanf("%s",a);
    int l=1,r=strlen(a);
    size = r;
    for (int i=0;i<size;i++) 
        if (a[i]=='l') ans[r--]=i+1;else ans[l++]=i+1;
    for (int i=1;i<=strlen(a);i++)
        printf("%d\n",ans[i]);
    return 0;
}

The Last Code ,it runs 515MS

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int ans[2000000];
string a;

int main()
{
cin >>a;
    int l=1,r=a.size();
    for (int i=0;i<a.size();i++) 
        if (a[i]=='l') ans[r--]=i+1;else ans[l++]=i+1;
    for (int i=1;i<=a.size();i++)
        printf("%d\n",ans[i]);
    return 0;
}

When input string size is 10^5

So , the reason is about second for loop.

And my question is why "strlen" function and print in for loop will make the code so slow?

share|improve this question
2  
You're wondering why doing strlen over 2MB, two million times, takes a second or two? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '13 at 6:23
    
You seem to want the 1-based indices of 'l' characters in a populated in the highest indices in ans, with non-l characters in the lower indices. But, ans[r--] is one too far to ans - you'll end up with a presumably-unwanted 0 value in the middle of ans. If this is unwanted, replace ans[r--] with ans[--r]. As others have said, you only need const size_t len = strlen(a); above your loops, then replace all the other strlen(a) with len. – Tony D Jan 21 '13 at 6:40
    
2000 mississippis? – thang Jan 21 '13 at 7:01
    
Did you run all the programs multiple times (dozens, at least) and take the average to ensure that the timings are reasonably reliable? – molbdnilo Jan 21 '13 at 9:11
    
@molbdnilo yes,I submit the program to OnlineJudge(Codeforces) many times,it uses g++ 4.7.2 to judge my program. – volz.kz.g Jan 21 '13 at 23:46

By writing strlen in the loop condition — a loop with two million iterations — you are scanning through a two-megabyte string two million times. Of course that's going to take some time!

That delay goes away when you pre-calculate the string length just once.

Also, you will probably find that streaming 2MB of text to the console is going to be noticeably "slow" in any case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you ,but that's not what I want to know.And I have test the time when I only make first for-loop have strlen ,it runs fast – volz.kz.g Jan 21 '13 at 6:42

The strlen function has to be executed each time through the loop when you have it in the loop. That's an extra function call, and it has to run through the full string to find it's length.

Caching the length in size, means that none of that has to be redone every time through the loop.

So, there is no error. This is expected behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
Um,But when I change the first for-loop's strlen function to size ,it runs fast. – volz.kz.g Jan 21 '13 at 6:33
    
That's because size is just a variable. But strlen is a function. So you have stored the result of strlen() in size. strlen() only gets called once. When you don't use size to store the result, strlen() gets called every time through the loop. Saving the result of a function in a variable is a great way to speed thing up, if you know that the result is not going to change! – DWright Jan 21 '13 at 6:34
    
Sorry,my description was wrong. It should be when I only change the second for-loop's strlen function to size,it runs fast.But when I only change the first for-loop's strlen function to size,it runs slow. – volz.kz.g Jan 21 '13 at 6:35
    
@volz.kz.g: You're trying to apply simplistic logic to draw a conclusion from the results you're seeing, but failing to consider a whole host of factors, such as caching, the writes into the array, and the fact that you're still dealing with two million elements. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '13 at 6:45
    
My suggestion: can you look at the assembly? Or run a profiler? This will reveal why optimizing the different loops is getting you different results. Finally, though you should not expect the loops to be optimizable to the same extent. They are different. – DWright Jan 21 '13 at 6:51

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