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I have written two perl scripts (parent.pl and child.pl), and their source codes are as follows:

parent.pl:

# file parent.pl

$SIG{CHLD} = sub {
    while(waitpid(-1, WNOHANG) > 0) {
        print "child process exit\n";
    }   
};

my $pid = fork();
if($pid == 0) {
    system("perl child.pl");
    exit;
}
while(1) {
    open my $fh, "date |";                                                                                                                                            
    while(<$fh>) {
        print "parent: ".$_;
    }   
    close $fh;
    sleep(2);
}

child.pl

#file child.pl

while(1) {
   open my $fh, "date |";
   while(<$fh>) {
       print "  child: ".$_;                                                                                                                                          
    }   
   close $fh;
   sleep(2);
}

What I want is the parent process and the forked sub-process output the current date alternately. But when I run perl parent.pl, the output is like this:

$ perl parent.pl 
parent: Mon Jan 21 14:53:36 CST 2013
  child: Mon Jan 21 14:53:36 CST 2013
  child: Mon Jan 21 14:53:38 CST 2013
  child: Mon Jan 21 14:53:40 CST 2013
  child: Mon Jan 21 14:53:42 CST 2013
  child: Mon Jan 21 14:53:44 CST 2013

It seems that the parent process was blocked when opening pipe.

But if I remove the following operation for signal CHLD.

$SIG{CHLD} = sub {
        while(waitpid(-1, WNOHANG) > 0) {
            print "child process exit\n";
        }   
};

And run it again. It seems OK.

$ perl parent.pl 
parent: Mon Jan 21 14:57:57 CST 2013
  child: Mon Jan 21 14:57:57 CST 2013
parent: Mon Jan 21 14:57:59 CST 2013
  child: Mon Jan 21 14:57:59 CST 2013
parent: Mon Jan 21 14:58:01 CST 2013
  child: Mon Jan 21 14:58:01 CST 2013

But I still feel puzzling. Why the parent process was blocked when I tried to open a pipe?

I don't think removing the SIG{CHLD} function is a good idea, becaue zombie processes should be retrieved.

Anyone can help me? Thank you very much!

==================================================================

Thank @Borodin to help me solve my puzzle. And I have tried to modify the parent.pl like this:

my $main_pid = $$;
$SIG{USR1} = sub {
        #sleep(1);
        while(waitpid(-1, WNOHANG) > 0) {
                print "child process exit\n";
        }
};

my $pid = fork();
if($pid == 0) {
    $SIG{USR1} = 'IGNORE';
    system("perl child.pl");
    kill USR1, $main_pid;
    exit;
}
while(1) {
    open my $fh, "date |";
    while(<$fh>) {
        print "parent: ".$_;
    }
    close $fh;
    sleep(2);
}

Since CHLD signal may be kicked off by open or system, I used another customized signal USR1. And it works well now.

========================================================================

The above modification still has problems. The forked sub-process send USR1 singal before exit. May be the parent process should sleep for a while before waitpid, because the sub-process hasn't exit yet.

I don't retrieve sub-process manually now, and set $SIG{$CHLD} = 'IGNORE'. Hope the sub-process can be retrieved by operation system when it exits.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is being made much more complex because both open my $fh, "date |" and system("perl child.pl") are starting child processes, as well as the explicit fork.

So fork starts a child process, which does system("perl child.pl") to start its own child process, which in turn does open my $fh, "date |", which opens yet another child, which is now a great-grandchild of the main parent process.

Meanwhile the main process does its own open my $fh, "date |" which starts another child process. In the end, the main process has two children, a grandchild and a great-grandchild.

Unfortunately the children that are started using open or system have an implcit wait attached to them, so they will kick off the CHLD signal when they complete but when the handler is executed there is nothing left to wait for so it will hang as you have seen.

perldoc perlipc has this to say

Be careful: qx(), system(), and some modules for calling external commands do a fork(), then wait() for the result. Thus, your signal handler will be called. Because wait() was already called by system() or qx(), the wait() in the signal handler will see no more zombies and will therefore block.

You can get things going by keeping to just a single parent and a single child process, like this.

use strict;
use warnings;

use POSIX ':sys_wait_h';

STDOUT->autoflush;

$SIG{CHLD} = sub {
  while(waitpid(-1, WNOHANG) > 0) {
    print "child process exit\n";
  }   
};

my $pid = fork();

if ($pid == 0) {
  while(1) {
    printf " child: %s\n", scalar localtime;
    sleep(2);
  }
}
else {
  while(1) {
    printf "parent: %s\n", scalar localtime;
    sleep(2);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a million for your reply. The above two scripts are used for example. What I actually do in the forked sub-process will be much more complex and the child.pl may vary from case to case. So I can't do that in a single parent and a single child process. Since wait() was already called by open and system, may be I can remove the SUB{CHLD} function directly, and send another signal before the forked sub-process exist? –  thomaslee Jan 21 '13 at 9:06
    
With your help, I have do some modifications as above to the parent.pl . It seems OK now. Thank you! –  thomaslee Jan 21 '13 at 9:17

Option 1

One way to do what you want is to synchronize with a pair of half-duplex pipes, created with pipe and open. Using a full-duplex socketpair may simplify the bookkeeping.

Opening a handle on "|-" implicitly forks a child process whose standard input is the read end of a pipe, and the write end is the filehandle returned to the parent. The parent releases the child with this implicit pipe and uses the explicitly created pipe as the back channel.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Fcntl qw/ F_GETFD F_SETFD FD_CLOEXEC /;
use IO::Handle;

pipe my $fromchild, my $toparent or die "$0: pipe: $!";
$_->autoflush(1) for $toparent, $fromchild;

my $flags = fcntl $toparent, F_GETFD, 0        or die "$0: fcntl: $!";
fcntl $toparent, F_SETFD, $flags & ~FD_CLOEXEC or die "$0: fcntl: $!";

my $pid = open my $tochild, "|-";
$tochild->autoflush(1);
die "$0: fork: $!" unless defined $pid;

if ($pid != 0) {
  while (1) {
    print "parent: ", scalar localtime, "\n";
    sleep 1;
    print $tochild "over\n";

    chomp($_ = <$fromchild>);
    exit 0 if $_ eq "over and out";
  }
}
else {
  exec "child.pl", fileno $toparent
    or die "$0: exec: $!";
}

The code in child.pl is below. Note that the parent passes a file descriptor that the child must dup to communicate with the parent in the other direction.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use IO::Handle;

my($fd) = @ARGV or die "Usage: $0 to-parent-fd\n";
open my $toparent, ">&=", $fd or die "$0: dup: $!";
$toparent->autoflush(1);

my $rounds = 5;
for (1 .. $rounds) {
  my $over = <STDIN>;
  print " child: ", scalar localtime, "\n";
  sleep 1;
  print $toparent ($_ < $rounds ? "over\n" : "over and out\n");
}

exit 0;

In concert, they look like

parent: Mon Jan 21 18:10:39 2013
 child: Mon Jan 21 18:10:40 2013
parent: Mon Jan 21 18:10:41 2013
 child: Mon Jan 21 18:10:42 2013
parent: Mon Jan 21 18:10:43 2013
 child: Mon Jan 21 18:10:44 2013
parent: Mon Jan 21 18:10:45 2013
 child: Mon Jan 21 18:10:46 2013
parent: Mon Jan 21 18:10:47 2013
 child: Mon Jan 21 18:10:48 2013

Option 2

A slightly more exotic arrangement is to have subprocesses arrange to take turns with one another in a ring or cycle. Going back-and-forth between parent and child processes is merely a cycle of length two.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use IPC::SysV qw/ IPC_CREAT IPC_PRIVATE S_IRUSR S_IWUSR /;
use IPC::Semaphore;

my $WORKERS = 3;

A given worker takes its own semaphore from the set but releases the next worker when finished.

sub take {
  my($id,$sem) = @_;
  $sem->op($id, -1, 0) or die "$0: semop: $!";
}

sub release {
  my($id,$sem) = @_;
  my $next = ($id + 1) % $WORKERS;
  $sem->op($next, 1, 0) or die "$0: semop: $!";
}

sub worker {
  my($id,$sem) = @_;

  for (1 .. 3) {
    take $id, $sem;

    print "[worker $id]: ", scalar localtime, "\n";
    sleep 1;

    release $id, $sem;
  }
}

Create the semaphore set and leave the first ready to run.

my $sem = IPC::Semaphore->new(
  IPC_PRIVATE,
  $WORKERS,
  IPC_CREAT | S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR)
    or die "$0: semget: $!";

$sem->setall((0) x $WORKERS);
$sem->setval(0, 1);  # unblock first only

Now we are ready to fork the subprocesses and let them execute.

foreach my $id (0 .. $WORKERS - 1) {
  my $pid = fork;
  die "$0: fork: $!" unless defined $pid;

  if ($pid == 0) {
    worker $id, $sem;
    exit 0;
  }
}

# wait on all workers to finish
my $pid;
do {
  $pid = waitpid -1, 0;
} while $pid > 0;

Sample output:

[worker 0]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:27 2013
[worker 1]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:28 2013
[worker 2]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:29 2013
[worker 0]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:30 2013
[worker 1]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:31 2013
[worker 2]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:32 2013
[worker 0]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:33 2013
[worker 1]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:34 2013
[worker 2]: Mon Jan 21 18:13:35 2013
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