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Consider a ASCII text file (lets say it contains code of a non-shell scripting language):

Text_File.msh:

spool on to '$LOG_FILE_PATH/logfile.log';
login 'username' 'password';
....

Now if this were a shell script I could run it as $ sh Text_File.msh and the shell would automatically expand the variables. What I want to do is have shell expand these variables and then create a new file as Text_File_expanded.msh as follows:

Text_File_expanded.msh:

spool on to '/expanded/path/of/the/log/file/../logfile.log';
login 'username' 'password';
....

Consider:

$ a=123
$ echo "$a"
123

So technically this should do the trick:

$ echo "`cat Text_File.msh`" > Text_File_expanded.msh

...but it doesn't work as expected and the output-file while is identical to the source.

So I am unsure how to achieve this.. My goal is make it easier to maintain the directory paths embedded within my non-shell scripts. These scripts cannot contain any UNIX code as it is not compiled by the UNIX shell.

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1  
Will your variables be within single quotes as shown above? –  Guru Jan 21 '13 at 8:12
    
@Guru - Currently, it is in single quotes or no surrounding quotes at all in the text file. –  Kent Pawar Jan 21 '13 at 8:18
1  
related question: superuser.com/q/235738/126693 –  abyss.7 Mar 9 at 18:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This solution is not elegant, but it works. Create a script call shell_expansion.sh:

echo 'cat <<END_OF_TEXT' >  temp.sh
cat "$1"                 >> temp.sh
echo 'END_OF_TEXT'       >> temp.sh
bash temp.sh >> "$2"
rm temp.sh

You can then invoke this script as followed:

bash shell_expansion.sh Text_File.msh Text_File_expanded.msh
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Hai Vu. I first set the variable $ LOG_FILE_PATH=/some/path then ran $ ./shell_expansion.sh Text_File.msh Text_File_expanded.msh (and also $ bash shell_expansion.sh Text_File.msh Text_File_expanded.msh) - but in the Text_File_expanded.msh the $LOG_FILE_PATH entries are replaced with blanks spaces. I may be doing this incorrectly.. –  Kent Pawar Jan 21 '13 at 8:37
1  
I had not exported the variables.. After I tried $ export LOG_FILE_PATH=/sone/path/ it worked fine. Thanks! :) –  Kent Pawar Jan 21 '13 at 8:44
    
super cool idea! –  anishsane Jan 21 '13 at 9:59

If a Perl solution is ok for you:

Sample file:

$ cat file.sh
spool on to '$HOME/logfile.log';
login 'username' 'password';

Solution:

$ perl -pe 's/\$(\w+)/$ENV{$1}/g' file.sh
spool on to '/home/user/logfile.log';
login 'username' 'password';
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Guru - I tried it and it works fine.. As I need to avoid a dependency on Perl I cannot apply this solution. I am not a Perl expert but are we sure that \w will always capture the shell variable name correctly..? –  Kent Pawar Jan 21 '13 at 8:52
    
Ok I goggled and got my answer - 1. PERL reference: \w will Match "word" character (alphanumeric plus ""). 2. UNIX shell reference: The name of a variable can contain only alphanumeric characters and "". –  Kent Pawar Jan 21 '13 at 8:56
1  
@KentPawar : you got it correctly. –  Guru Jan 21 '13 at 8:59
    
Hi All - Typos in my above comment: the "_" was taken as not marked as code and so was used to make the text italics.. Sorry. –  Kent Pawar Jan 21 '13 at 9:31

One limitation of the above answers is that they both require the variables to be exported to the environment. Here's what i came up with that would allow the variables to be local to the current shell script:

#!/bin/sh
FOO=bar;
FILE=`mktemp`; # Let the shell create a temporary file
trap 'rm -f $FILE' 0 1 2 3 15;   # Clean up the temporary file 

(
  echo 'cat <<END_OF_TEXT'
  cat "$@"
  echo 'END_OF_TEXT'
) > $FILE
. $FILE

The above example allows the variable $FOO to be substituted in the files named on the command line. I'm sure it can be improved, but this works for me so far.

Thanks to both previous answers for their ideas!

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Thanks @PaulGear! Welcome to StackOverflow. +1 For using trap to clean up temporary files. I have suggested some edits to make it easier for newbies like myself to understand the code; kindly review the edits and revert them if required. thanks –  Kent Pawar Jul 4 '13 at 6:17
    
I didn't get which signal the 0 refers to. –  Kent Pawar Jul 4 '13 at 6:19
1  
0 signifies normal exit rather than a signal. –  Paul Gear Jul 5 '13 at 9:57
    
I'm not sure why you think semis are necessary on variable assignments and traps but not echos and cats, but the comments are useful so i don't plan to revert. –  Paul Gear Jul 5 '13 at 9:59
    
Thanks Paul. About the semis- just added them while adding the comments; not that its necessary, just a force of habit :) –  Kent Pawar Jul 5 '13 at 10:29

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