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I want to find frequency of a matrix by their column. for example for matrix x below

   x <- matrix(c(rep(1:4,3),rep(2:5,2)),4,5)
   x
         [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
   [1,]    1    1    1    2    2
   [2,]    2    2    2    3    3
   [3,]    3    3    3    4    4
   [4,]    4    4    4    5    5

now how can find frequency of each unique column and create a matrix that each column is a unique column of x and the last row is added as the frequency of it in matrix x

 #freqmatrix
        [,1] [,2]
 [,1]      1  2
 [,2]      2  3
 [,3]      3  4
 [,4]      4  5
 [,5]      3  2
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are the duplicate rows always consecutive? –  Arun Jan 21 '13 at 9:35
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What's your end goal, exactly? In other words, how are you going to work with this data further? If it's just tabulation, doesn't paste() get you to the answer?

x <- matrix(c(rep(1:4,3),rep(2:5,2)),4,5)
x1 <- data.frame(table(apply(x, 2, paste, collapse = ", ")))
#         Var1 Freq
# 1 1, 2, 3, 4    3
# 2 2, 3, 4, 5    2

If you do want Var1 separated, you can use read.csv() on that column.

cbind(read.csv(text = as.character(x1$Var1), header = FALSE), x1[-1])
#   V1 V2 V3 V4 Freq
# 1  1  2  3  4    3
# 2  2  3  4  5    2

Or, if you prefer to transpose your output:

t(cbind(read.csv(text = as.character(x1$Var1), header = FALSE), x1[-1]))
#      [,1] [,2]
# V1      1    2
# V2      2    3
# V3      3    4
# V4      4    5
# Freq    3    2
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your solution was good as others. thanks –  morteza Jan 21 '13 at 20:47
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Here is a solution avoiding converting the matrix to a list of lists, but it is also a little messy:

x.unique <- unique(x, MARGIN  = 2)

freq <- apply(x.unique, MARGIN = 2, 
              function(b) sum(apply(x, MARGIN = 2, function(a) all(a == b)))
        )

rbind(x.unique, freq)

     [,1] [,2]
        1    2
        2    3
        3    4
        4    5
freq    3    2
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thanks for your answer –  morteza Jan 21 '13 at 11:43
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This answer will be a little messy as it involves lists of lists which I couldn't avoid:

x <- matrix(c(rep(1:4,3),rep(2:5,2)),4,5)
#convert columns to elements in list
y <- apply(x, 2, list)

#Get unique columns
unique_y <- unique(unlist(y, recursive=FALSE))

#Get column frequencies
frequencies <- sapply(unique(y), function(f) sum(unlist(y, recursive=FALSE) %in% f))

#Bind unique columns with frequencies
rbind(simplify2array(unique_y), frequencies)

And behold:

            [,1] [,2]
               1    2
               2    3
               3    4
               4    5
frequencies    3    2
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your solution was messy but interesting. thanks a lot –  morteza Jan 21 '13 at 11:45
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One liner using aggregate (if your input is a data.frame):

y <- matrix(c(1:4, 2:5, 1:4, 1,3,4,5, 2:5), ncol=5)
> y
#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
# [1,]    1    2    1    1    2
# [2,]    2    3    2    3    3
# [3,]    3    4    3    4    4
# [4,]    4    5    4    5    5

z <- as.data.frame(t(y))
> t(aggregate(z, by=z, length)[1:(ncol(z)+1)])
#      [,1] [,2] [,3]
# V1      1    1    2
# V2      2    3    3
# V3      3    4    4
# V4      4    5    5
# V1.1    2    1    2

Note: this solution will be fast if the number of columns in your input matrix x is greater than its nrows, i.e., ncol(x) >> nrow(x).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot. It's so faster than others –  morteza Jan 21 '13 at 12:00
1  
Please don't use this on a large data.frame. Check this post. –  Arun Jan 21 '13 at 14:44
1  
thanks, as my dataframs is large, your notification was good. –  morteza Jan 21 '13 at 20:48
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