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For example I have 4 tables, all with say userID (which can be referenced more than once. So for example I can have:

Cars
id, ..., userID  // userID = owner of the car

Garages
id, ..., userID // userID = owner of the garage

Tools
id, ..., userID // userID = owner of the tool

Now I want to do a query to delete the user, but I only want to delete the user if all their related data is gone. In other words, I want to make sure there is no referenced data (let's say I'm not allowed to have userID = -1 or null. It has to be assigned to a user

The only way I can see to do the checks is:

SELECT count(*) FROM Cars WHERE USERID = userID
SELECT count(*) FROM Garages WHERE USERID = userID
SELECT count(*) FROM Tools WHERE USERID = userID

Where I have to check if any of the results is greater than 0. Is there a way to do this check across N tables in one SQL SELECT query?

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5  
Add a foreign key from all those tables to the user table. If you then delete a user which is still referenced you'll get an error which you can catch. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 21 '13 at 8:46
    
YOu can count over a Union of all tables. But elegant way is to declare referential integrity as @a_horse_with_no_name say. –  danihp Jan 21 '13 at 8:47
    
@a_horse_with_no_name If you want to put your comment up as an answer, I will accept it as the answered one. The problems of coding very long hours, sometimes you miss the obvious :( –  Stephane Grenier Jan 21 '13 at 8:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to prevent deleting of users that still have cars, garages or tools you should add a foreign key from those tables to the user table.

If you then try to delete a user which is still referenced you'll get an error which you can catch and deal with, e.g. by displaying an approriate error message to the user.

This has the added benefit that the deletion will always be prevented, regardless on how someone tries to delete a user (SQL commandline, a buggy piece of code in your application, ...)

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You can just add up the counts, like this:

SELECT (SELECT count(*) FROM Cars WHERE USERID = userID)
     + (SELECT count(*) FROM Garages WHERE USERID = userID)
     + (SELECT count(*) FROM Tools WHERE USERID = userID)
FROM ...

If the result is non-0, you have a referenced user.

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you are ridhgt! +1 sorry, I delete comments. –  danihp Jan 21 '13 at 14:27
SELECT  (SELECT count(*) FROM Cars WHERE USERID = userID) as CarCount
,       (SELECT count(*) FROM Garages WHERE USERID = userID) as GarageCount
,       (SELECT count(*) FROM Tools WHERE USERID = userID) as ToolCount
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You could also try this, if Cars is the main table which you want to change:

SELECT count(*)
FROM   Cars 
       INNER JOIN
       Garages 
       ON Cars.USERID = Garages.USERID, 
       INNER JOIN
       Tools
       ON Cars.USERID= Tools.USERID
WHERE  Cars.USERID = SOME_USER_ID;

Suggest to create a foreign key for the USERID.

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