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In our project we often choose algorithm by some conditions.

For example, suppose we need to print order for different products. We need to choose different blanks and retrieve different data according to product type, price or any other product characteristic. Usually, we write something like this.

public interface IOrderPrinter
{
    bool CanPrint(Order order);
    PrintResult Print(Order order);
}

class CompositeOrderPrinter : IOrderPrinter
{
    private IList<IOrderPrinter> printers;

    public bool CanPrint(Order order)
    {
        return printers.Any(p => p.CanPrint(order));
    }

    public PrintResult Print(Order order)
    {
        foreach (var printer in printers)
        {
            if (printer.CanPrint(order))
                return printer.Print(order);
        }
        // throw some exception
    }

    public void AddPrinter(IOrderPrinter printer)
    {
        printers.Add(printer);
    }
}

class FirstOrderPrinter : IOrderPrinter
{
    public bool CanPrint(Order order)
    {
        return order.ProductType == ProductType.Banana && order.Price < 100;
    }

    public PrintResult Print(Order order)
    {
        if (!CanPrint)
            // throw some exception
        // print ...
    }
}

class SecondOrderPrinter : IOrderPrinter
{
    public bool CanPrint(Order order)
    {
        return order.ProductType == ProductType.Apple;
    }

    public PrintResult Print(Order order)
    {
        if (!CanPrint)
            // throw some exception
        // print ...
    }
}

Does this pattern have any commonly known name? Yes, it's look pretty similar as Composite pattern, but there are differences anyway. Is there any standard design pattern which solves this task in better (more elegant, less code, ...) way? It'll be interesting to read about another ways to implement similar behavior.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

When you choose an algorithm at runtime, it's called the Strategy Pattern.

In computer programming, the strategy pattern (also known as the policy pattern) is a software design pattern, whereby an algorithm's behaviour can be selected at runtime.

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Yeah, thanks! I've read about strategy pattern more carefully and notice that context can choose concrete strategy in direct way or by some factory. –  Kirill Jan 26 '13 at 7:40

That is a strategy pattern you have implemented, as Philipp said. Template pattern is an alternative.

But you need to take a call if the loss of flexibility is ok in your particular case.

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Actually they're not mutually exclusive. You can implement strategy internally using template method pattern. In the printer example, you could create a base class that handles "if (!CanPrint) // throw some exception". –  dzendras Jan 21 '13 at 10:17

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