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0Dear StackExchange Community,

I have for two hours tried to find the source of the problem but failed completly. Research=google search also did not provide any viable solutions. At least I was able to discover that under VS 6.0 one cannot split the declaration and implementation of a template function between header and .cpp-file.

Perhaps my approach is inherently flawed or it is VS 6.0 that is being particulary obnoxious this time.

Here is the test code I wrote.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class TestClass{

  public:
     template<class T> inline bool isNull(T& inObject){
        return 0;   // edited because of the answer by Joachim Pileborg  :)
                // initial code was: return (inObject != NULL) ? 0:1; 
  }

};

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    cout<<TestClass::isNull<string>("test");
    return 0;
}

Running this code causes the following error:

fatal error C1001: INTERNER COMPILER- FEHLER (Compiler-File "msc1.cpp", Row 1794)

Does anybody have an idea what I am doing wrong here?

P.S. : this time i really endevoured to ask the question as precisly as possible also providing a concrete example. Please let me know if there is anything else I should have added.

P.SS: I know that visual studio 6.0 ist pretty old but I am forced to use it at work. Running the same code with the a new compiler (at home) did not cause any errors. This is why I assume that the problem is mainly caused by the whims of VS 6.0.

Thanks in advance for you help !! JD

share|improve this question
1  
Why use the ternary operator? Just use return the result of the comparison as it's already a boolean. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 21 '13 at 9:44
    
VC++ 6.0 support for templates was quite lacking. You could try 1) helping the compiler by constructing the argument explicitly instead of relying on conversions cout << TestClass::isNull<string>(string("test"));, or ... –  Angew Jan 21 '13 at 9:50
1  
2) not specifying the template argument explicitly cout << TestClass::isNull(string("test")), or ... –  Angew Jan 21 '13 at 9:50
2  
And, the template should take its argument as const T&, since you're passing temporaries into it. –  Angew Jan 21 '13 at 9:52
3  
“I know that visual studio 6.0 ist pretty old but I am forced to use it at work” – quit the job. This is the most constructive advice I can give you, I’m afraid. If your company doesn’t care enough to provide you with adequate tools they’re a bad employer. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 21 '13 at 9:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Unless you define a custom casting operator that returns a pointer, an object instance can never be equal to NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
okey id did not know that thanks- still i updated my code to just return 0 all the time and it still throws the same error :( –  Andrey Lujankin Jan 21 '13 at 9:50
    
@AndreyLujankin Then I think it's time you think about updating Visual Studio. Version 6 is ancient, and contains quite a few bugs that won't be fixed. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 21 '13 at 9:58
    
okey i will try pleading with the IT-department ... I do not think they will listen. I am the only person coding in C++ so they won't be very motivated to cater to my needs –  Andrey Lujankin Jan 21 '13 at 10:16

Apart from facts noted in comments and answers, internal compiler error happens in situation, when there's a bug in the compiler, that prevents it from compiling valid code.

Microsoft usually fixes these bugs in IDE hotfixes or in newer versions of compilers. Try to modify the structure of code such that it does the same thing, but looks differently - it's the only way to avoid the Internal Error problem.

share|improve this answer
    
any Idea how i could do that in the particular case described above ? –  Andrey Lujankin Jan 21 '13 at 9:59
    
Have you read all answers? You may as well always return false, because it is not possible to pass a reference to a NULL object. It would make sense if you passed a pointer - in which case there would be no need for templates, effectively solving the problem. –  Spook Jan 21 '13 at 10:27
    
I did try to always return 0 - i even altered the code above accordingly. The thing is it seems that I cannot use any templates at all. I tried constructing the simplest examples possible. –  Andrey Lujankin Jan 21 '13 at 10:31

There are several troubles in your code:

I rewrote it this way:

  • comparing the adress of the reference you're passing (you have edited your question but you wrote inObject==NULL in the body of your function and it couldn't compile either)
  • using const string& so has to be able to call TestClass::isNull<string>("test");
  • you must define your function as static if you want to call it the way you do
  • I'm not sure but the character '<' following your word template looked badly encoded in my IDE, so I replaced it with a commonplace <, it compiled better
  • it's a way of coding, but prefer using typename than class when defining templates
  • prefer using true and false instead of 1 and 0 ( you edited your question but you still return 0...)

=>

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class TestClass{

  public:
    template<typename T> 
    static bool isNull(const T& inObject)
     {
        return (&inObject == NULL) ? true : false;
    }

};

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    cout<< TestClass::isNull<string>("test");
    return 0;
}

Now it compiles fine.

share|improve this answer
    
nullptr in VC++ 6.0? Are you sure it works? –  Angew Jan 21 '13 at 9:52
    
thank you :) - I tried running your code but I still get the same error. Must be really a problem with VS 6.0 –  Andrey Lujankin Jan 21 '13 at 9:54
    
did you try it with VS C++ 6.0 ? –  Andrey Lujankin Jan 21 '13 at 10:00
    
@Angrew you're right, I'm sure it doesn't work :-) I modify the code –  Stephane Rolland Jan 21 '13 at 10:00
3  
References can never be NULL! –  Alex Chamberlain Jan 21 '13 at 10:20

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